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  1. #1
    yurisrey's Avatar
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    "recycling" old fogged film-an experiment

    Cleaning out my darkroom I found a half-used spool (~50') of +40 yr old film Valca 6 DIN Ortho (my Dad's) inside a box w/ no can, it was just out in the open. Being ever so curious I decided to try an experiment: Can it be "recycled?"
    With the lights on, I fogged the heck out of it and developed it in Dektol 1:1. Once it was all black I washed it well, put the cover on the dev. tank and bleached. It was then washed well again and left it overnight to dry. The next day I put it in my slr and did some exposure tests in my backyard:
    fast lens, long exposure: f 1.8 for 7 secs on a nice and bright sunny day. Dektol 1:1 for 3 min/wash/fix. I wonder now how other stocks would do, for example would a PAN still be panchromatic afterwards? Anyone ever played around w/ this?
    Click image for larger version. 

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    "The real work was thinking, just thinking." - Charles Chaplin

  2. #2

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    What did you bleach with? I suppose the drying afterwards was done in darkness?

  3. #3
    yurisrey's Avatar
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    CuCl for 15 min. All steps after bleach were done in darkness.
    "The real work was thinking, just thinking." - Charles Chaplin

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    I really can't understand how you did it. Could you please tell us more about the procedure that you followed? Sounds very interesting.

  5. #5
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    If I understand it right... he ruined it by fogging it and processing it... then in the dark, chemically bleached it and washed it, but leaving the now bleached silver salts remaining, which made them, once again, sensitive to light. It's an interesting idea.
    Jim MacKenzie - Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada

    A bunch of Nikons; Feds, Zorkis and a Kiev; Pentax 67-II (inherited from my deceased father-in-law); Bronica SQ-A; and a nice Shen Hao 4x5 field camera with 3 decent lenses that needs to be taken outside more. Oh, and as of mid-2012, one of those bodies we don't talk about here.

    Favourite film: do I need to pick only one?

  6. #6
    yurisrey's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PhotoJim View Post
    If I understand it right... he ruined it by fogging it and processing it... then in the dark, chemically bleached it and washed it, but leaving the now bleached silver salts remaining, which made them, once again, sensitive to light. It's an interesting idea.
    that's it... although just for the record, the film was already ruined when it was found.
    here's the process at 68F:

    1) You'll need old film that has been fogged or accidently exposed
    2) Fog it under a strong light source
    3) Spool it onto a tank reel & develop in strong developer until completely black (metallic silver)
    4) Wash 2 min
    5) Placed lid on tank and put in CuCl bleach (from B&H) for 15 min (silver halide, AgCl I suppose?)
    6) Washed for +5 min
    7) Opened inside the Darkroom and hung it to dry overnight.
    8) Spooled it into a cartridge and did exposure tests.
    I figured it be very slow working off reversal re-exposure as my guide. My initial guess was about 15 secs full daylight, but half of that was needed.
    9) Developed & Fixed.
    "The real work was thinking, just thinking." - Charles Chaplin

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    Interesting, this might help me salvage the box of 11x14 Efke 100 that accidentallly got fogged...I just can't bear the thought of throwing it away.

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    This is bogus. Bleaching the exposed, developed emulsion doesn't render it light sensitive again. Nice try.

  9. #9
    AgX
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    Oxidizing and rehalogenizing metallic silver to gain a light-sensitive emulsion again is a well established process in photography.

    Though one should not expect the sensitivity of the original emulsion.

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    I take it back then .. I didn't know this....so if I tried to sepia tone a print, and bleached and toned it in the dark, I would end up with no image? Or if I develop a black and white print, then bleach and redevelop in the dark, I would end up with no image? How do you "oxidize" the silver as well as re-halogenating? Does bleaching in CuCl oxidize as well as bleach?

    Could this be done to remove base fog from film/paper? Say you had 400 ISO film with some fog. Could you develop and bleach it, and would the unexposed emulsion retain its former speed, and the rehalogenated base fog would no longer be fog, but a halide with very low speed?

    I have some 1950's Ilford HP3 with so much fog that this would make an interesting experiment.

    Interesting.

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