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Thread: Selenium Toning

  1. #1
    marciofs's Avatar
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    Selenium Toning

    Two questions

    Is it ok to wash and dry my prints and the after have many prints toning them all together in order to save Selenium?

    It may be ok with avarege papers but with ART 300 is it ok?


    Also, How to make the print more or less sepia? Is it a mater of just washing more?

    Thanks.

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    Klainmeister's Avatar
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    It's hard to save selenium because selenium a metal that gets used up based on the amount of silver. So if you have 10 sheets of paper, it will use the same amount of selenium regardless of technique.

    Sepia a function of toning. Sepia or brown toners, for example.

    Based on your questions, I would highly recommend picking up a book on darkroom techniques. Tim Rudman, Ralph Lambrecht, etc etc. It'll pay for itself within the first few sessions.
    K.S. Klain

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    Do you mean that the ART300 is developed in a warmtone developer and then you are using the selenium to darken and cool the shadows? In that case use a weaker dilution of the toner (or a cooler temperature if you are using it hot) to make the change a little slower and easier to control. It is also an excellent idea to make a test print of the critical area of your production print, then keep that test (wet) next to the version being toned - it makes it easier to see small changes by direct comparison.

    There are ways of split-toning in both sepia and selenium, but someone who has tried that will have to comment. You could try "split-toning" in the site search function too.

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    Marciofs, are you asking if you can produce a sepia or sepia like tone with Selenium or was your question nothing to do with Selenium toning but to do with sepia toners which of course are not the same as selenium?

    pentaxuser

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    marciofs's Avatar
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    I have "The Ansel Adams Guide" book 1

    The think is that it will be the first time toning so I am not sure if there is any difference toning the print when it is wet and after it was dried.

    My question is about selenium toning and sepia toning. I know they are different chimicals.

    question 1: Toning after wards or when the print is wet?

    question 2: How to control the sepia tones, or it intensity (when using sepia toning of course).

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    Quote Originally Posted by marciofs View Post
    Also, How to make the print more or less sepia? Is it a mater of just washing more?

    Thanks.
    You asked two questions. The second is quoted above and it is to this question that I was looking for your explanation.

    pentaxuser

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    MattKing's Avatar
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    I regularly tone prints on a different day then they are printed.

    You need to thoroughly wet the prints before you start the toning process.

    And you can adjust the strength of the sepia effect by adjusting the relative times in the separate bleach and toner steps (assuming you are using a two step sepia toner).
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

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    Quote Originally Posted by marciofs View Post
    My question is about selenium toning and sepia toning. I know they are different chimicals.

    question 1: Toning after wards or when the print is wet?

    question 2: How to control the sepia tones, or it intensity (when using sepia toning of course).
    If the print has dryed you must soak it in water before toning or the print may become mottled.

    Selenium is a metaloid in the same family as sulfur. Sepia is a color. I think you are refering to sulfide toning which can produce a sepia tone.

    You control the amount of toning and/or color by either dilution or by the time in the toner. Each toner formulation is different with commercial toners follow the manufacturers instructions.
    A rock pile ceases to be a rock pile the moment a single man contemplates it, bearing within him the image of a cathedral.

    ~Antoine de Saint-Exupery

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    Bill Burk's Avatar
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    I got a very unusual effect when I did this once. I had dried the prints face down on a screen. The emulsion must have "hardened" more or less where it touched the screen surface because when I Selenium toned them, a faint but distinct "screen" pattern showed. So heed the advice to soak well.

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    Interestingly and this may have nothing to do with the OP's question about sepia in a mainly selenium thread, the instructions for Ilford's selenium suggest that bleaching a print with to quote Ilford's words "sepia bleach" and then soaking in Ilford selenium gets you a red/brown effect. I presume sepia bleach is simply a reference to a normal ferricyanide bleach

    pentaxuser

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