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Thread: Rollei IR film

  1. #1

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    Rollei IR film

    Can I use my 89b filter for the Rollei IR film?

    Jeff

  2. #2

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    Yes, but you lose a lot of speed. I don't remember what I settled at with this combination, maybe EI 6 or 12---you'll need to do your own testing, but I would start in that range.

    -NT
    Nathan Tenny
    San Diego, CA, USA

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    DWThomas's Avatar
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    Yes, the 89B will work. The numbers I've seen place its cut-off around 695 nm and the often quoted filter seen today is an R72 or whatever that is 720, so an 89B might be a hair more visible light. But as Nathan says, you need a lot of exposure, I typically add about 6 stops more than an EI 400 reading; e.g., EI 6 or even a bit slower.

    If you want the classic IR effects, you will always be needing a lot of exposure with what little IR material is left today. The films barely extend into the IR region, so cutting off most of the visible spectrum doesn't leave much. I believe the EFKE was rated at 100 without a filter, but can actually be faster in IR use because its IR scale is longer. (Unfortunately I think it is going away, if not gone.)

    In my opinion, IR film is always a candidate for testing and bracketing, although a couple of rolls I ran last July/August went better for me than some earlier ones. For sure, using a TLR avoided removing the filter to aim and compose - that streamlined things a lot over an SLR used previously.
    Last edited by DWThomas; 03-23-2013 at 09:20 PM. Click to view previous post history.

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    Rollei IR film

    I would start exposing at EI 6ASA and bracket to give more exposure. With my developer I ended up preferring EI 4.5ASA. I would second the TLR suggestion for IR. I am fortunate to have found a Rollei bayonet I IR filter, and it has made the whole process much simpler. The only downside is the fixed lens. Alex

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    MattKing's Avatar
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    I would be concerned about a filter with a 695nm cut-off. I think that you might find the IR component of the light would be swamped by the visible portion between 695nm and 720nm.

    The RZ2 filter works well for me with the Rollei IR film and my Mamiya TLR.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

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    I use ISO 1.5-3 with the Hoya R72 and EFKE Aura (now discontinued)
    and ISO 6-12 for the Rollei IR with the same R72 filter.

    If you get less IR-light for your filter, I would start at ISO 1,5-3 with the Rollei and see where it took me.
    -
    "Nice picture, you must have an amazing camera."
    Visit my photography blog at: http://helino-photo.blogspot.com

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    mono's Avatar
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    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IR Ende August 2012.jpg 
Views:	45 
Size:	244.1 KB 
ID:	66192
    This is what I got with ISO 3 and Rollei IR at the end of August with Heliopan RG 715. First try with this film.
    A bad scan I know.
    ________

    Regards
    Folker

    MonoArt - fine photographs

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    Rollei IR film

    You might find this thread helpful, I created it a while back.

    http://www.apug.org/forums/forum48/114065-help-asap-ir-question-before-i-fly-out.html

    Though I'm not familiar with your filter, I'm still not sure why B+W calls theirs a 92 when it's similar to the 72 that Hoya carries, and the 93 is closer to accurate, but the B+W 92 worked great for me.


    ~Stone

    Mamiya: 7 II, RZ67 Pro II / Canon: 1V, AE-1, 5DmkII / Kodak: No 1 Pocket Autographic, No 1A Pocket Autographic | Sent w/ iPhone using Tapatalk
    ~Stone | "...of course, that's just my opinion. I could be wrong." ~Dennis Miller

  9. #9

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    Thanks for all the help!

    Jeff

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    DWThomas's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MattKing View Post
    I would be concerned about a filter with a 695nm cut-off. I think that you might find the IR component of the light would be swamped by the visible portion between 695nm and 720nm.

    The RZ2 filter works well for me with the Rollei IR film and my Mamiya TLR.
    Visible light is supposed to range from about 390 to 700 nm, so a 695 nm filter is in fact wiping out most of the visible spectrum. That said, I think the IR effects I got on IR400 were slightly better with a 720, but then too, my Wratten 89B was purchased circa 1965! I'm fairly convinced the IR effects are further influenced by lighting, season of the year, etc., so I view all of it as a 'grande experiment'. It could be instructive to shoot the same scene with my 89B, 720 and 760 filters minutes apart some time, but the 89B is a series VII adapted to Bay I, and the others are 77 mm and 67 mm, so using them all on one of my cameras might be problematic (maybe gaffer's tape is in my future!)

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