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  1. #1
    EASmithV's Avatar
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    Ilford Ortho Plus

    Hey All,

    Just got a box of Ortho Plus in 4x5, and can't wait to try it out.
    I'm wondering if anyone has some advice on shooting it.
    I plan to shoot it at ISO 100 (or even better, 200) and develop in Rodinal or HC-110.

    Dev times anyone? Sample Photos?
    www.EASmithV.com

    "The camera is an instrument that teaches people how to see without a camera."— Dorothea Lange
    http://www.flickr.com/easmithv/
    RIP Kodachrome

  2. #2
    cliveh's Avatar
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    I have used this in the darkroom, but not in camera. Just remember it has limited spectrum sensitivity.

    “The contemplation of things as they are, without error or confusion, without substitution or imposture, is in itself a nobler thing than a whole harvest of invention”

    Francis Bacon

  3. #3
    Rick A's Avatar
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    Why would you shoot it at 100 when its rated at 80 in daylight and 40 for tungsten? Just remember, it has no red sensitivity, and portraits with it will show skin as dark, and show every pore.
    Rick A
    Argentum aevum

  4. #4
    PhotoJim's Avatar
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    I agree about the EI. If you want to shoot at ISO 200, get a film that is designed for it. Foma 200 is pretty nice film if you can get it, or you can shoot Tri-X at EI 200-250 if you adjust development accordingly.
    Jim MacKenzie - Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada

    A bunch of Nikons; Feds, Zorkis and a Kiev; Pentax 67-II (inherited from my deceased father-in-law); Bronica SQ-A; and a nice Shen Hao 4x5 field camera with 3 decent lenses that needs to be taken outside more. Oh, and as of mid-2012, one of those bodies we don't talk about here.

    Favourite film: do I need to pick only one?

  5. #5
    skahde's Avatar
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    Why would one want to shoot Ortho in the field? A blue filter with panchromatic film will do the same thing. This stuff can do nice tricks in the lab, though as you can safely handle it under red light.

  6. #6

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    I use it in the field now and then. With a yellow filter looks much like regular B&W film. Easy to load and develop in lab with red lights on. I have a few posted over at LF photo from 4x5 and 8x10.

  7. #7
    EASmithV's Avatar
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    To address questions:

    I like the look of ortho tones.
    I like the grain structure of ortho films, which cannot be replicated with filtration.
    Filtration is annoying for handheld use in my SLR.
    Foma 200 is a great film, but it is not ortho.
    I like even ASA ratings for the most part, and that extra 1/3rd stop could help for handheld use.

    C'mon guys, you all are being as bad as Kodak recommending T-Max as a replacement for everything... Where is your sense of adventure?
    Last edited by EASmithV; 03-29-2013 at 08:31 AM. Click to view previous post history.
    www.EASmithV.com

    "The camera is an instrument that teaches people how to see without a camera."— Dorothea Lange
    http://www.flickr.com/easmithv/
    RIP Kodachrome

  8. #8
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    The grain structure of Ilford Ortho Plus is similar to FP4, I used both very extensively, that can't be changed by filtration.

    Ian

  9. #9
    Rick A's Avatar
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    To replicate pan film with ortho, use a green filter to darken the sky. If you dont use a filter, the sky will print out as white with no cloud distinction. Red, orange, and yellow filters have little to no effect. Underexposing ortho film won't gain you any advantages, just underexposed film. I've shot two boxes of Ortho+ 4x5 so far and it does not have the exposure latitude of pan films.
    Rick A
    Argentum aevum

  10. #10
    EASmithV's Avatar
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    Well, I just shot a test sheet, a portrait of my brother who has skin issues, to highlight the film's strengths and weaknesses.
    As said above, it does seem to make the skin issues more evident, but we'll see what it looks like in positive.

    However, saying that it will not push to 200 is incorrect, I had very good results. Details to follow.
    www.EASmithV.com

    "The camera is an instrument that teaches people how to see without a camera."— Dorothea Lange
    http://www.flickr.com/easmithv/
    RIP Kodachrome

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