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Thread: Bad Pan F ??

  1. #21
    Roger Cole's Avatar
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    15 seconds seems ridiculously short to me, though I can't argue with someone who says "works for me" in their particular situation. OTOH, film doesn't have the moisture content of, say, a chunk of steak and doesn't have to "thaw" in the same way. My rule of thumb has always been to be sure any visible condensation is gone and the film cartridge (for 35mm) or paper and spool (for 120) doesn't feel cooler than ambient. This will take longer than 15 seconds for most of us, but not hours either. Probably more like 15 minutes depending on ambient temperature and humidity.

    For 4x5 I do wait longer because it's always wrapped inside the box. So far I've not had any problems with it either but the preparation I use for loading holders pretty much ensures I have to plan time for it anyway so film warming is just included - typically I take the film out earlier in the day when I plan to load holders that night.

  2. #22

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    Well, the film canister being made of metal and being conductive, and being so small, it warms up in 10 seconds in my hands.
    The film itself, the acetate or whatever plastic it is, really doesn't hold cold or heat.
    Now we're down to the emulsion: Its thickness being measured in microns, it too can't hold moisture for more then a few seconds.

    Arguing makes no sense. Just take out a roll of film in the freezer, hold it in your hand for
    15 seconds then bring it to your cheek. Still cold? If still cold, wait 5 more seconds.

  3. #23

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    Just checking back in again for a response. Looks like I'll be OK using the film. I'll process one roll and then evaluate before shooting the other three just to be sure. To address some earlier questions: the box was closed but out of the shrink wrap. All four canisters had the plastic tops popped off but the canisters metal end caps were secure. There are two different colors of plastic with the pan f and that may help account for the matter. Thanks for all the responses.

  4. #24

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    Just because the can feels warm to your cheek the insides will still be quite cold.

    I don't believe it has warmed within 15 seconds but once you've loaded that film, it is still warming and by the time you take your first shot it most likely has come up to full ambient temperature.

    In the end, things are probably fine.
    Last edited by wblynch; 04-06-2013 at 04:31 PM. Click to view previous post history.
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  5. #25
    Roger Cole's Avatar
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    Bad Pan F ??

    I have film I've been trying to find time to develop for over six months. I refrigerate it unless I can get to it within a couple of weeks. Just not enough time.

  6. #26
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    Is it a frost free freezer? if it is, then you shouldn't have any issues, if it's NOT frost free, I would shoot a roll and test it, if it's fine, then it's fine, the only concern is if moisture actually penetrated the can itself through the felt and then froze to the emulsion and then burst/cracked the emulsion and then you would have an issue but in the short time period you mentioned I very much doubt any issues could arise even if the freezer is not frost free it should be fine as the frost most likely would only have penetrated the top layer which will be exposed when you load the film in the camera anyway.

  7. #27

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    rules of thumb

    My rules of thumb for cold stored 35mm film have stayed the same since roughly 1988: If the film is stored in the fridge, let it warm up for an hour before loading in the camera (I have reduced this to 1/2 hour if I'm impatient with no ill effects). I've never really stored it in the freezer, but have some Rollei IR 400 in the freezer now and will probably let it warm up 3-4 hours if not overnight before loading it.
    ME Super

    Shoot more film.
    There are eight ways to put a slide into a projector tray. Seven of them are wrong.

  8. #28
    Roger Cole's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by noacronym View Post
    I never refriged/froze film but once. Never again. Maybe if I lived up North where it's ALWAYS freezing, hence no condensation. Down here you may as well store it in a bucket of water.
    I don't have any problems at all in Georgia. Of course I take it out in the house which is air conditioned in the summer and heated in the winter and not very humid either time, and let it warm before taking it out or loading it.

  9. #29

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    Quote Originally Posted by noacronym View Post
    I never refriged/froze film but once. Never again. Maybe if I lived up North where it's ALWAYS freezing, hence no condensation. Down here you may as well store it in a bucket of water.
    I've never had the top pop off a plastic canister, but rarely use 35mm nowadays so don't have much of a sample space to draw on.

    It gets humid here in the summer, though not as bad as SC, but I've never had problems with my frozen film. It's all in Ziplock bags in the freezer, and I just take out what I need several hours before I'll need it. On those rare occasions where I don't have a lot of lead time I'll stick 35mm or 120 rolls (in the original canisters or foil wraps) in my pockets to help them along.

    The pocket trick doesn't work well for sheet film, which is why I always keep a box at room temp.

  10. #30

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    Quote Originally Posted by NB23 View Post
    Film is not food.
    Boulderdash sir. Film is indeed food for our lovely devices.

    To the freezing to thaw notion I'd be hard pressed to believe that it could thaw in anything close to that, but having shot plenty of film in conditions equally cold or colder than my freezer I'd believe it would function fine. Might get kinda sticky in the machine if it's a warm day...

    And to the OP: I would never believe that "Bad" and "PanF" could be in the same sentence.
    Last edited by sepiareverb; 04-07-2013 at 04:49 PM. Click to view previous post history.

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