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  1. #1
    Shawn Dougherty's Avatar
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    Overexposed TMax 400 - 4x5

    I was out photographing in a new to me area of my favorite place (McConnells Mill State Park, Pennsylvania) this weekend and after making two negatives of one composition I noticed a detail just below me and to my left. A small peninsula made of dark mud and surrounded by a relatively still pool with a couple of floating leaves, dark water, and some lovely white sticks at the base - all lit with a wonderful and intense angular sunshine. The creek walls are deep at this point, about 300 feet and fairly steep. The sun was about to duck behind them so I was in a hurry and had little time to think.

    I made two identical exposures on TMax 400 (TMY2) sheet film. After making them, the sun dipped below the gorge walls and the scene before me was gone. I ran through my meter readings and realized I had made an error and given the scene at least one more stop exposure (maybe two) than I normally would have... But, it was too late to expose more film and the peninsula, if not already washed away, surely will be by the time I return.

    The scene contained about 6 stops PLUS one more if I count the specular highlights. Having done things properly I would have exposed for either 1/15" or 1/8" at f32 and developed for N-1. For me N-1 translates to 12minutes in a tray using Rodinal diluted 1:125 at 70°, agitation for the first minute then every 30 seconds for the remaining time.

    As it actually happened... I exposed for 1/4" @ f32. Considering I normally put my shadows on Zone IV, an extra 1 or 2 stops means the film received a good bit of light. I usually make fully exposed and underdeveloped negatives and print at relatively high paper grades (3.5 to 4.5 in Ilford Filter Terms) onto Ilford Warmtone FB.

    All that taken into account I'm thinking my best plan of action is to develop the first negative as I normally would (N-1), had I exposed it properly . I make soft negatives so there SHOULD be some room at the top end for the highlights to further develop, especially considering the straight line curves of Tmax400. I want a contrasty print so maybe I'll get that, just with a longer exposure than I would normally use... and if it turns out the highlights are bullet proof I can always alter the second negative accordingly.

    So my question is... "Does This Make Sense?" I DO NOT want to get into using another developer or process. I have a system dialed in (when I don't make a careless metering mistake) and I believe my best bet is trying to fix it within the scope of that system.

  2. #2
    Shawn Dougherty's Avatar
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    For the sake of giving complete information, the film was exposed using a Toyo 45AII and Fujinon 150mm NW f5.6 lens with a rubber hood.

  3. #3
    StoneNYC's Avatar
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    Overexposed TMax 400 - 4x5

    Watch out, if you do any more thinking your brain will explode lol.

    That's all the help I can give, besides suggest you develop and adjust a stop and then print with higher contrast?


    ~Stone

    Mamiya: 7 II, RZ67 Pro II / Canon: 1V, AE-1, 5DmkII / Kodak: No 1 Pocket Autographic, No 1A Pocket Autographic | Sent w/ iPhone using Tapatalk
    ~Stone | "...of course, that's just my opinion. I could be wrong." ~Dennis Miller

  4. #4
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
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    If you made two sheets, why not try developing one as you otherwise would have? TMY will not lose highlight contrast due to density unless you really abuse it. One stop is nothing. Even two stops is fine, since TMY-2 holds about a 14 stop range in linear fashion. Your highlights will be there, but your print exposure time will be longer.

    Or better yet, if you really want to know, find a scene with similar lighting conditions and expose a sheet the same way. Try developing normally and see if your paper likes it or not. If you cut developing time too much, chances are you compress the tone scale too much, which isn't necessarily desirable.

    - Thomas
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

  5. #5

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    Shawn, your planned N-1 is probably fine. I wouldn't give less development than that. N-1 with your developer/film should be a mild enough contraction not to introduce too much highlight compression. Since the densities will likely end up somewhere in the V-XII range, you don't want to compress local contrast too much on the high end.

  6. #6
    Shawn Dougherty's Avatar
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    I know, Stone... =) I'm probably getting a bit carried away here. It's certainly not the end of the world but it was a cool composition and the light was sweet.

    Thomas and Michael,
    Thank you. That's what I was thinking. I've got two shots at this so I thought I'd just check my theory with a couple others before proceeding.
    Thanks, guys!
    Shawn

  7. #7
    StoneNYC's Avatar
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    Overexposed TMax 400 - 4x5

    Quote Originally Posted by Shawn Dougherty View Post
    I know, Stone... =) I'm probably getting a bit carried away here. It's certainly not the end of the world but it was a cool composition and the light was sweet.

    Thomas and Michael,
    Thank you. That's what I was thinking. I've got two shots at this so I thought I'd just check my theory with a couple others before proceeding.
    Thanks, guys!
    Shawn
    Better post the results!


    ~Stone

    Mamiya: 7 II, RZ67 Pro II / Canon: 1V, AE-1, 5DmkII / Kodak: No 1 Pocket Autographic, No 1A Pocket Autographic | Sent w/ iPhone using Tapatalk
    ~Stone | "...of course, that's just my opinion. I could be wrong." ~Dennis Miller

  8. #8
    polyglot's Avatar
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    One or two stops over is nothing. Develop as you normally would, especially if (as you say) you tend to make softer negs. TMY2 has so much headroom that you won't even be able to tell from the print that the neg got a bit more exposure.

  9. #9
    Bill Burk's Avatar
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    I also recommend developing exactly as you planned for N-1. Only thing that happened is that you are further up the straight line.

    I just developed several sheets where I rated TMY-2 at 64 and I will have no problem printing from them...

  10. #10

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    hi shawn

    as long as you aren't printing them with UV light you will be OK.
    even kodak says 1 stop over develop as normal, and your development
    methodology will be perfect ... i look forward to the results !
    john
    if my apug gallery looks empty you might check these places

    website
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