Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,959   Posts: 1,558,116   Online: 1131
      
Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 27

Thread: Pyro toxicity?

  1. #1
    SchwinnParamount's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Tacoma, WA
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    1,017
    Images
    42

    Pyro toxicity?

    I read somewhere once that all of the pyro film developers out there are highly toxic and must be used with great care. I have young kids at home and no lock on my chemical cabinet. If I start working with a pyro developer, should I be any more vigilant than I am with XTOL?

  2. #2

    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Århus, Denmark
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    2,102
    Images
    16
    I suggest you look at this thread

  3. #3
    c6h6o3's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    3,190
    Images
    6
    Quote Originally Posted by SchwinnParamount
    I read somewhere once that all of the pyro film developers out there are highly toxic and must be used with great care. I have young kids at home and no lock on my chemical cabinet. If I start working with a pyro developer, should I be any more vigilant than I am with XTOL?
    I've been using pyrogallol based developers since before my children were born. No more vigilance has ever been necessary with this chemical than is necessary with chlorine bleach or drain cleaner, both of which are far more accessible to the children than my photo chemicals.

  4. #4
    rusty71's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    St. Louis, MO USA
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    212
    Images
    8
    That's a good thread. I have read that Pyro is also a suspected carcinogen. It is a known mutagen, which indicates a very likely carcinogen. Honestly, I use Rodinal, and my theory is that if your ideas are bad, no magic elixir developer is going to make you a better photographer. But to each his/her own.

  5. #5
    Silverpixels5's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Houston, TX
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    594
    Images
    15
    Most anything is a carcinogen in sufficient doses. Good lab practices should keep you in the clear.
    RL Foley

  6. #6

    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Posts
    5,243
    Images
    9
    No, the cabinet should be 6 feet or more above the floor and locked.
    Technological society has succeeded in multiplying the opportunities for pleasure, but it has great difficulty in generating joy. Pope Paul VI

    So, I think the "greats" were true to their visions, once their visions no longer sucked. Ralph Barker 12/2004

  7. #7

    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    4,530
    The pyro toxicity myth is overblown, but it is better to be safe than sorry. If I had young children at home, regardless of my knowledge in chemistry I would have it under lock. The first thing a child will do when they find something is to try to taste it, clearly even if pyro was not toxic, it is not something you want them eating.

  8. #8
    rbarker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Rio Rancho, NM
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,222
    Images
    2
    Quote Originally Posted by SchwinnParamount
    . . . If I start working with a pyro developer, should I be any more vigilant than I am with XTOL?
    I think the answer to your question is, "A little, perhaps." But, if you read the references pointed to in the thread Morten mentioned, I think you, too, will come to the conclusion that the pyro-paranoia is substantially over-blown. Nitrile gloves are probably a good idea (to avoid trans-dermal absorbtion), but everyone should be using those when working with chemicals anyway.

    Should chemical cabinets be locked? Sure, just like household chemical cabinets, if there are small children about. But, naturally, don't leave the key abound where they can get to it. They watch, and figure all of these things out, ya know. Once they reach an age where they can really understand things, dissolving a piece of bologna in sulfuric acid in front of them as a warning about chemicals, and a mention of how much it hurts to be dissolved, usually does the trick.
    [COLOR=SlateGray]"You can't depend on your eyes if your imagination is out of focus." -Mark Twain[/COLOR]

    Ralph Barker
    Rio Rancho, NM

  9. #9
    rusty71's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    St. Louis, MO USA
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    212
    Images
    8
    Actually, if my parents had shown me how to dissolve bologna in acid, I would've though "Cool! I'm gonna pick that lock!"
    Probably follwing normal safety procedures with Pyro will be adequate. There is a detailed article here: http://unblinkingeye.com/Articles/PCat/pcat.html

    Below is a quote from the article which bears on the original question:
    "Both Pyrogallol and Pyrocatechin are very toxic chemicals. However, the primary danger to photographers is dermal absorption and breathing the dry powder, both of which are easily avoided. Always use rubber gloves when processing sheet film in trays, and either go outdoors or use a vent hood to mix Pyrogallol or Pyrocatechin into solution. By following these simple procedures, and exercising common sense, the potential health risks associated with using these chemicals for developing film are virtually eliminated."

    I still like Rodinal though....

  10. #10
    SchwinnParamount's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Tacoma, WA
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    1,017
    Images
    42
    Quote Originally Posted by jdef
    ... If you have young kids in your home, you should lock your chemical cabinet.

    Jay
    The cabinet is actually quite a ways out of their reach. It is 5 feet above the floor and there are obstacles in front of it ( such as a locked darkroom door... most of the time) plus the kids know to stay away from the stuff. I was more concerned about an accidental spill or powder in the air that poisons the environment of my house.

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin