Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 68,767   Posts: 1,484,173   Online: 826
      
Page 4 of 4 FirstFirst 1234
Results 31 to 34 of 34
  1. #31

    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Oregon and Austria
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    787
    Quote Originally Posted by markbarendt View Post
    The point I see many people miss is that the paper defines the range that prints straight and easy from the negative.
    Absolutely! Thanks for clarifying.

    Basically, what I am saying is that compensation allows a greater subject brightness range to be squeezed in to the density range of the negative that will print well on a particular contrast-grade paper. I need to be more precise when I express such things so as not to add to the confusion.

    Best,

    Doremus

  2. #32

    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Montreal, Canada
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,272
    To clarify it slightly, I'd prefer saying it allows a greater total subject brightness range to print straight on a particular contrast grade.

    Interestingly, although a subject for a different thread, I think most people would be somewhat surprised with the amount of compensation (relatively little) that occurs with diluted general purpose solvent developers and current films.

  3. #33

    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Escondido, California, USA
    Shooter
    35mm RF
    Posts
    646
    Quote Originally Posted by Michael R 1974 View Post
    To clarify it slightly, I'd prefer saying it allows a greater total subject brightness range to print straight on a particular contrast grade.
    The compression occurs in the highlights, so shadows and midtones will have normal gradation.

    Suppose you want the opposite. Suppose you want compression in the shadows, with normal gradation in midtones and highlights?
    Underexpose, and/or use a film with a long toe.
    That will also compress a wide image-scale to fit the paper.
    It depends on where you want the compression.

    Mark Overton

  4. #34

    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Montreal, Canada
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,272
    There is more compression in the highlights, but there is compression everywhere. That's why compensating techniques usually require an increase in exposure (which doesn't help much), and true compensating/acutance developers tend to compress midtones as well. Compensating techniques with general purpose solvent developers don't do as much as people think they do.

    Compensating techniques need to be used carefully or you can easily end up with negative that ends up being more difficult to print than if you had given a more mild contraction.

    So I'll say it again: Compensation allows a greater total subject brightness range to print straight on a particular contrast grade. Local contrast throughout is another story.

Page 4 of 4 FirstFirst 1234


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin