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  1. #11
    polyglot's Avatar
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    Sure, some components will go off before others. It totally makes sense to replace one bath (e.g. CD is likely to go first and my local lab tells me that the pre-bleach# dies quickly in a processor tank) when other baths (bleach, fix) are still in good condition.

    Trying to fix up the individual chemicals in one bath though is madness - unbaking a cake as pointed out above. Particularly because the chemical products of decomposition are chemically active and so merely replacing the missing parts will not restore you to the original bath effect.


    # this is problematic because the chromes are handed over to the customer looking magnificent; they discolour in a couple of months and a whole bunch of customers get very angry.

  2. #12
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    Replenishing specific E-6 Developer chemicals that go bad

    Ok ok, I accept defeat thank you EVERYONE for the input.

    I can see how it's more complex than I originally suspected.

    I was thinking there might be ONE or maybe two components to the mix that were going bad, I guess I was wrong.

    I'm still searching for the FULL mix for all the chemicals in E-6 process, no one seems to have the exact formulas to make simple 1L mixes from scratch. Ah well, I'll keep going.


    ~Stone

    Mamiya: 7 II, RZ67 Pro II / Canon: 1V, AE-1, 5DmkII / Kodak: No 1 Pocket Autographic, No 1A Pocket Autographic | Sent w/ iPhone using Tapatalk
    ~Stone | "...of course, that's just my opinion. I could be wrong." ~Dennis Miller

  3. #13

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    It's hard to know who to listen to on the 'net, so maybe it'll help to point you to the Kodak Z-manuals. These manuals were originally made for processing labs, and are basically the "user manuals" for all of their color processes.

    Here's a link to Z-119, for the E-6 process manuals: http://www.kodak.com/global/en/busin...als/z119.jhtml

    I know it seems a bit complicated, so you may want to go straight to part 5, "Corrective Actions for Processing Solutions". Especially the last page, "Compensating for Low Utilization." This is basically your situation when you process a little, then let the chemicals sit for some time. (You've further complicated yours with "underreplenishment.") Kodak uses a cookbook-style approach here, to figure how much replenishment to use. (Read my prior post if you want an idea of what is happening with the chemical components.)

  4. #14
    StoneNYC's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr Bill View Post
    It's hard to know who to listen to on the 'net, so maybe it'll help to point you to the Kodak Z-manuals. These manuals were originally made for processing labs, and are basically the "user manuals" for all of their color processes.

    Here's a link to Z-119, for the E-6 process manuals: http://www.kodak.com/global/en/busin...als/z119.jhtml

    I know it seems a bit complicated, so you may want to go straight to part 5, "Corrective Actions for Processing Solutions". Especially the last page, "Compensating for Low Utilization." This is basically your situation when you process a little, then let the chemicals sit for some time. (You've further complicated yours with "underreplenishment.") Kodak uses a cookbook-style approach here, to figure how much replenishment to use. (Read my prior post if you want an idea of what is happening with the chemical components.)
    Thanks, i've been referred here before, however this only works on the 6(7) bath kits not the 3 bath ones... but perhaps I'll someday get the home jobo machines everyone talks about that supposedly will make my life much easier (after the cost).

  5. #15

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    Ok, I've finally seen the light. Since you said a 3-bath kit, I went looking; it seems that you may be using a 3-bath E-6 from Tetenal. It looks like no replenishers are available, so there are no obvious options to extend life. (I'd be afraid to try another vendor's replen on top of this, for various reasons.)

  6. #16
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    Replenishing specific E-6 Developer chemicals that go bad

    Quote Originally Posted by Mr Bill View Post
    Ok, I've finally seen the light. Since you said a 3-bath kit, I went looking; it seems that you may be using a 3-bath E-6 from Tetenal. It looks like no replenishers are available, so there are no obvious options to extend life. (I'd be afraid to try another vendor's replen on top of this, for various reasons.)
    Yes I actually use the Arista not Tentenal, it's cheaper and I don't see anything bad about it except the blacks are a slight brown but scanning with black points a little darker seems to solve most of that.

    Ok thanks for the tips.


    ~Stone

    Mamiya: 7 II, RZ67 Pro II / Canon: 1V, AE-1, 5DmkII / Kodak: No 1 Pocket Autographic, No 1A Pocket Autographic | Sent w/ iPhone using Tapatalk
    ~Stone | "...of course, that's just my opinion. I could be wrong." ~Dennis Miller

  7. #17

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    Dear Stone !!

    Do you know the „colour reversal club“ ??

    There is a huge amount of information in the archive, and at least 2 VERY GOOD formulations.
    My favourite formulation is the "E7" Formula, I assume this is as close on the Kodak formula as possible.

    http://theatreorgans.com/hammond/ken...m/kodake71.htm

    A more diluted and more contemporary formulation is the CRC e6 formulation.
    http://theatreorgans.com/hammond/ken...htm/crce61.htm

    Actually I do prefer "E7" formulation. Keep in mind that minor pH variations of the CD may be necessary for drum processing. Simply do some test strips and add sodium hydroxide solution 10% in small amounts to optimize your Process.

    The late AGFA had a hobby / Drum processing pac with a Ph of about 12.1 for the CD…


    Happy reading, this is / was a great site…
    Regards Stefan

    By the way, there are various patents on the net from Fuji too, they are quite similar to the Kodak formulations, but do use mostly slightly different Iodide and Bromide concentrations in the developers (less in the FD, more in the CD)

  8. #18
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    Replenishing specific E-6 Developer chemicals that go bad

    Quote Originally Posted by stefan4u View Post
    Dear Stone !!

    Do you know the „colour reversal club“ ??

    There is a huge amount of information in the archive, and at least 2 VERY GOOD formulations.
    My favourite formulation is the "E7" Formula, I assume this is as close on the Kodak formula as possible.

    http://theatreorgans.com/hammond/ken...m/kodake71.htm

    A more diluted and more contemporary formulation is the CRC e6 formulation.
    http://theatreorgans.com/hammond/ken...htm/crce61.htm

    Actually I do prefer "E7" formulation. Keep in mind that minor pH variations of the CD may be necessary for drum processing. Simply do some test strips and add sodium hydroxide solution 10% in small amounts to optimize your Process.

    The late AGFA had a hobby / Drum processing pac with a Ph of about 12.1 for the CD…


    Happy reading, this is / was a great site…
    Regards Stefan

    By the way, there are various patents on the net from Fuji too, they are quite similar to the Kodak formulations, but do use mostly slightly different Iodide and Bromide concentrations in the developers (less in the FD, more in the CD)
    Wow ok! Excited to read all of this!


    ~Stone

    Mamiya: 7 II, RZ67 Pro II / Canon: 1V, AE-1, 5DmkII / Kodak: No 1 Pocket Autographic, No 1A Pocket Autographic | Sent w/ iPhone using Tapatalk
    ~Stone | "...of course, that's just my opinion. I could be wrong." ~Dennis Miller

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