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  1. #11
    MattKing's Avatar
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    The Kodak Data sheet for both T-Max and T-Max RS specifies exactly the same storage life for both - whether you refer to mixed working solution or concentrate.

    Here is the link: http://www.kodak.com/global/en/profe...bs/j86/j86.pdf
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by jnanian View Post
    if the developer consists of part a and part b and you don't plan on using part b ?
    why use the developer at all ?
    Because I got it cheap with a bunch of stuff when a camera store closed

    Seriously, though, it is a very small additive and I cannot find what it is for. While many attest to the longevity of TMAX mixed as needed, I've found few with the equivalent information for the RS version (after adding the packet, but not working solution).

    I think the Kodak data is for working solution and unused concentrate. I don't think it includes dipping into the concentrate as needed, let alone with the packet added to the RS yet not a working solution. I could be wrong; been reading too many PDFs lately.

    I doubt the B packet makes the difference between regular TMAX and RS, but one does wonder. That is why I've been searching for information on it. One can assume it is necessary or not - both are just assumptions.

    For my purposes at the moment, however, I will be testing/comparing developers with a great deal of identically exposed rolls of film - all will be quite boring. So I might as well mix it - but then I'll not know what happens if I don't.

    On second thought, since I'm wasting a bunch of film and chemicals to satisfy my own curiosity, I suppose I can wast 6 more rolls and divide the RS into "with B" and with "without B."
    Truzi

  3. #13
    MattKing's Avatar
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    The RS version is designed to permit use in a replenishment regime, and the non-RS version isn't.

    The non-RS version has problems with dichroic fog when used with sheet film, and Kodak recommends against using it with sheet film. The RS version is recommended for use with sheet film.

    The data sheet is fairly informative:

    "T-MAX Developer is intended for use in unreplenished systems. For replenished systems, use T-MAX RS Developer and Replenisher. T-MAX RS Developer and Replenisher is a hydroquinone-based, two-part developer specially formulated for replenished systems, but you can also use it in unreplenished systems.
    T-MAX Developer is available as a one-part concentrate in sizes to make one gallon and five gallons of working solution. You can easily mix smaller volumes by mixing one part of the concentrate with four parts water. T-MAX RS Developer and Replenisher is available in convenient sizes to make one gallon and ten gallons of solution; use this solution as a working-tank solution or a replenisher. The ten-gallon size consists of two separate units, each to make five gallons of solution."
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  4. #14
    Truzi's Avatar
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    In the areas I am knowledgeable, I have no problem going against some manufacturer recommendations because I know enough about it to do so safely and achieve the purpose I want (and am willing to suffer the consequences).
    I'm trying to get there in this area, though chemistry is one of my weak suits in general, let alone how it applies to absolutely anything in the real world.

    (In my last post I said "unused" concentrate, I meant "unopened." Sorry, I am usually more precise than this when communicating via writing. In person, not so much .)
    Truzi

  5. #15
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    Many people including John Sexton have been using it this way since it came out. I use T-Max RS one shot because I use it with sheet film, because I think the results are often subtly superior to the non-RS even without sheet film (but have trouble telling you why) and because I'm used to it. This works.

    I found that thread for you. Reminds me that I was doing this the hard way too until I read this - and this simplified my life.

    http://www.largeformatphotography.in...-one-shot-quot

    Or if you aren't a member and don't want to join, Google is your friend:

    http://www.largeformatphotography.in...p/t-73585.html

  6. #16

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    Thanks so much. I'll just mix and use it up and buy more if it goes bad

  7. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by MattKing View Post
    The RS version is designed to permit use in a replenishment regime, and the non-RS version isn't.

    The non-RS version has problems with dichroic fog when used with sheet film, and Kodak recommends against using it with sheet film. The RS version is recommended for use with sheet film.

    The data sheet is fairly informative:

    "T-MAX Developer is intended for use in unreplenished systems. For replenished systems, use T-MAX RS Developer and Replenisher. T-MAX RS Developer and Replenisher is a hydroquinone-based, two-part developer specially formulated for replenished systems, but you can also use it in unreplenished systems.
    T-MAX Developer is available as a one-part concentrate in sizes to make one gallon and five gallons of working solution. You can easily mix smaller volumes by mixing one part of the concentrate with four parts water. T-MAX RS Developer and Replenisher is available in convenient sizes to make one gallon and ten gallons of solution; use this solution as a working-tank solution or a replenisher. The ten-gallon size consists of two separate units, each to make five gallons of solution."
    years ago on the advice of someone at kodak ( who must have mixed up the differences between rs version and the non rs version )
    i used the non rs version with sheet film.
    my tests came out fine, so i did a bunch of film ( 4x5 ) with it for a job, and it all ended up with dichroic fog.
    i won't use the developer again ...

    THEN i was told to throw away all my film because it was no good ...

    i spoke to paul krot, the founder of sprint systems of photography, and he helped me save my film
    using farmer's reducer. if i am to use a off the shelf developer, i'd use sprint any day of the week ...

    best of luck with your developer !

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