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Thread: Ethol LPD

  1. #11
    pstake's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Richard Jepsen View Post

    The extreme ends, 1:1 vs 1:5, combined with toning on some papers may be more dramatic.

    You can't make neutral/cool Ilford MGIV look warm.

    LPD fully develops prints in 120s unlike 130 diluted 1:3 or higher.
    The extreme cold-tone end would be undiluted as opposed to 1:1.

    Even with MGIV, the difference between 1:0, 1:1, and 1:2, is noticeable from cold blue blacks to mildly cool blacks. This is, at least, my experience, which is admittedly only 10 years, and using LPD for only two of them.

  2. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by Richard Jepsen View Post

    LPD fully develops prints in 120s unlike 130 diluted 1:3 or higher.
    You are clearly saying that LPD develops all prints in 120 seconds if the dilution is 1+3 or higher. Does 120 seconds apply to other dilutions and what is the significance of "unlike 130" ? Is this Ansco 130 and you are saying that the difference is that LPD retains the two minute development time but the Ansco 130 then needs longer than 120 seconds at dilutions of 1+3 or higher

    If I have fully understood your statement above then it sounds as if LPD develops all print in 120 seconds irrespective of the dilution?

    Have I got this correct?

    Thanks

  3. #13
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    In prints LPD 1+1 or 1+3 the tone change was subtle but noticeable.
    It is dramatic if you do 1+10 or higher (warning, you maybe only able to develop a few prints so keep the stock handy to replenish)

    However, when you tone the print the way it reacts can be dramatic
    You get nice aubergine tones with selenium and dark chocolates or "caffe au lait) tones with viradon.
    Mama took my APX away.....

  4. #14

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    I find LPD takes at least 3 mins, typically I give it 4, but of course everyone has different ways of working, just my 2cents

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by rorye View Post
    I find LPD takes at least 3 mins, typically I give it 4, but of course everyone has different ways of working, just my 2cents
    It is fully dependent on temperature, and little bit less dependent on exposure. you are right in that we all find different ways.
    Mark Barendt, Ignacio, CO

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

  6. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by markbarendt View Post
    It is fully dependent on temperature, and little bit less dependent on exposure. you are right in that we all find different ways.
    Can you give more details? For instance is the 3 mins the right time for the usual 20 degrees C and if so is there a table or any user experience here to show what times might be for someone with a Nova processor where the temp cam be increased considerably and might there be limit to the max temp at which LPD will work properly? If so what might this be?

    Thanks

    pentaxuser

  7. #17
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by markbarendt View Post
    It is fully dependent on temperature, and little bit less dependent on exposure. you are right in that we all find different ways.
    I'm with Rory. I use LPD replenished, and recently tested to see what three and four minute developing times do, and there is a definite increase in 'weight' to the print tonality going to 4 minutes.
    It also depends a bit on print size. I develop longer for a 16x20 than I do for an 11x14, because of the fine detail that starts to appear when the prints are bigger. That micro detail appears to almost lower overall contrast (it doesn't actually do that), but to counteract that impression I leave it in for a bit longer. That is way easier than to give 1/2 grade more contrast.

    After reading all of the above I'm keen to try LPD undiluted.
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

  8. #18

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    OK still waiting for answers to the correlation between temp and dev time but it is early days, especially in the U.S.( breakfast time in California ) but can it be confirmed that greater dilutions do not increase dev time by those who have tried different dilutions or is there also a relationship between dilution and dev time?

    It strikes me that for stuff that has been around a long time there seems to be so little in terms of technical detail which I find surprising.

    pentaxuser

  9. #19
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by pentaxuser View Post
    OK still waiting for answers to the correlation between temp and dev time but it is early days, especially in the U.S.( breakfast time in California ) but can it be confirmed that greater dilutions do not increase dev time by those who have tried different dilutions or is there also a relationship between dilution and dev time?

    It strikes me that for stuff that has been around a long time there seems to be so little in terms of technical detail which I find surprising.

    pentaxuser
    Sorry, can't help you with that... I don't live in California.
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

  10. #20
    markbarendt's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by pentaxuser View Post
    Can you give more details? For instance is the 3 mins the right time for the usual 20 degrees C and if so is there a table or any user experience here to show what times might be for someone with a Nova processor where the temp cam be increased considerably and might there be limit to the max temp at which LPD will work properly? If so what might this be?

    Thanks

    pentaxuser
    LPD, in my experience, stops working below 18 degrees Celsius. At 19°C I will run about three to four minutes. At 20°C I like to run about 2 minutes. At 22 I'll run about 90 seconds. One thing to keep in mind here is that your thermometers and my thermometers will read differently, it is not uncommon to see two different thermometers show a 1 or 2° difference.

    These are baseline numbers depending on the prints and what I'm looking for, as Thomas says running a little extra can get or add weight to the print, the need for that is totally subjective.

    All the developers that I have used, come up quickly to a certain point (say over the first 90 seconds) and then the progress moves slowly from there to completion. Anywhere after that first 90 seconds or so you can decide where to stop depending on your needs, including how much exposure you have given the print.
    Mark Barendt, Ignacio, CO

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

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