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Thread: Ethol LPD

  1. #1

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    Ethol LPD

    I know there have been several threads on this but I thought it best to place my request on a new thread.

    A recent thread about its longevity made me research its other properties and it seems that depending on dilution it will do a range of tones from a light warm brown to dark brown in WT papers and from very light to warm silver through to cold to blue black in cold/neutral papers.

    I did some research and stole the above categories from a description Les McLean gave several years ago when he explained what dilutions gave what colour and my thanks to his post.

    Could any of you LPD users out there show examples of what these different dilutions produce as a print. A set of different tones of the same print and in both WT and cold/neutral paper would be ideal but any examples will be appreciated

    This stuff is not easy to get in the U.K. but it might be worth the effort depending on the results on prints


    Thanks

    pentaxuser

  2. #2
    pstake's Avatar
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    Hi, Pentaxuser,

    If you take a look at the prints scanned for this post: http://www.apug.org/forums/forum65/1...-parallax.html

    ... these were made on Adorama's RC VC cold tone, using 1:1 dilution LPD.

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    SuzanneR's Avatar
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    Several years ago, I tested out different dilutions of the LPD on Ilford warmtone paper, and though the differences were quite obvious in person from 1:1 dilution to 1:5, it was harder to discern a difference when I scanned the prints. Just a little too subtle for the scanner. It's a great all purpose developer, and since it comes in a powder form it doesn't cost as much to ship, highly recommended.

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    Roger Cole's Avatar
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    I mentioned once on FADU that I use it but had heard it was hard to find in the UK, and several people replied telling me where they got it. I don't remember now, but apparently it is available in the UK. I can check FADU and see if I can find that thread.

    EDIT:

    http://www.film-and-darkroom-user.or...thol#post66956

    AG Photographic carries it but says they are waiting for fresh stock:

    http://www.ag-photographic.co.uk/eth...gal-2356-p.asp

    That price is about double what I pay for it, though. At current exchange rates 19.95 GBP is $30.60 USD and I pay $15.99/gallon for the powder from Freestyle. However I have to admit that I like it enough I'd still use it if it were $30.

  5. #5

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    Thanks all so far. I had feared that the differences, especially between the different tones on cold/neutral paper might be so subtle that a scan of a print wouldn't show it. I imagine purely from Les McLean's category descriptions that WT paper is probably more responsive but its the cold/neutral paper where the differences are subtle.

    I may be looking for the "Holy Grail" here but if I am honest I was hoping that even with neutral/cold paper that I could get a reasonably warm look.

    If Suzanne can see a difference with her naked eye then I should as well provided my eye is as discerning.

    Can I ask this to help clarify: How much warmer in relation to other WT developers can LPD warm up neutral paper? I am a RC user and have access to Ilford, Fotospeed,Kentmere and Adox RCVC

    Any one of these papers more responsive than the others?

    One additional question if I may: It sounds as if I'd need to go to 1:4 or even 1:5 to get warmth so how much does this extend developing time?

    Thanks for your info on LPD as well, Roger. It would appear that Ag is my only bet and as you say it is waiting for fresh stock but I'll check Silverprint as well.

    pentaxuser

  6. #6
    pstake's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by pentaxuser View Post

    One additional question if I may: It sounds as if I'd need to go to 1:4 or even 1:5 to get warmth so how much does this extend developing time?

    pentaxuser
    Going from 1:1 to 1:2 made a noticeably warmer image on ILFORD MGIV fiber, for me. It extended development by 30 seconds to a minute. (It took an extra 30 seconds or so for the image to appear, in the developer. I left it in for 3 minutes (I think).

    At 1:1, I usually leave it in for 2:15 ... Anyway, 1:2 is the "warmest" i've ever diluted LPD.

    If Thomas Bertilsson (sp?) sees this thread, he may be able comment more intelligently. I seem to remember seeing LPD listed as his paper dev of choice in the gallery. And he, like Suzanne, seems generally to be more attuned to the nuance of paper and chemistry, than me.

    I like LPD's versatility for sure; but mostly I like its economy. Stuff lasts forever and ever.

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    I've tested 4 different papers at 4 different dilutions.
    My scanning skills are not too good but I'd be happy to send you the test strips.
    It is a super developer.

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    rorye, a kind of a swatch book of print/dev dilutions.That's a great offer but have a look at where I am - in a place called Daventry in the heart of the U.K. Midlands. Only about 7000 miles away

    If you are still willing then what would it cost to send them to the U.K.? If the cost is reasonable I can cover it with Paypal if you have an account.

    Let me know. Thanks

    pentaxuser

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    I use LPD at 1:3 all the time. The tone shift is not dramatic. Shifts may be aided by toning or pulling a print. For reference, think Ilford's PQ universal paper developer used with Galerie.

    Galerie untoned is just left of neutral. PQ is just left of neutral vs the same print developed in Dektol. Compare the Galerie 1:3 print to a similar print developed 1:3 in LPD but toned in KRST. The tone shift would move from from just left of neutral to a cooler just right of neutral tone.

    Think of the tone difference between pulling a print vs normal 2 min development. That may be another way to visualize how much the tone scale can be bent with LPD dilutions. The extreme ends, 1:1 vs 1:5, combined with toning on some papers may be more dramatic.

    You can't make neutral/cool Ilford MGIV look warm.

    LPD fully develops prints in 120s unlike 130 diluted 1:3 or higher.
    Last edited by Richard Jepsen; 04-15-2013 at 06:28 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    RJ

  10. #10
    Roger Cole's Avatar
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    Reportedly you can make MGWT look cool with Moersch SE6. There was a thread about that here. But I agree that you can't do so with LPD though you could cool it slightly compared to a warm tone developer.

    I use LPD 1+2 and find it slightly cooler than Dektol, or at least not quite as much green tinge. I still routinely tone in dilute KRST for cool/neutral papers.

    I should also point out that LPD is available, at least in the US, as a liquid concentrate. You pay more for the convenience and probably more for shipping but that might be worth it to you. The important thing is that the liquid is more concentrated than the stock mixed from powder so you dilute the liquid concentrate 1+4 for the same results as 1+2 from the powder. Otherwise, I've used both and they seem identical.

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