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  1. #11

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    Making a cup of tea is a really simple process.

    Now write down every single step you take to do so, and add all the caveats that might go wrong, and how to avoid them.

    Almost any activity that appears simple hides levels of complexity. When something is done with practice of many years, it becomes easy to forget that it might appear difficult to those who are not so practised, or someone who is less dextrous ...

  2. #12
    mr rusty's Avatar
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    It takes practice doesn't it! I do clip the corners *very* slightly, and do sometimes still find I get 3/4 of the film on and then it sticks. I find if I grip each spool loosely and give a sort of light "vibration" wiggle while sort of "loosening" the two halves against each other the sticking usually clears and the film winds in.

    The other thing I do is pull the whole film out of the cassette first and cut it off, and then let it coil back into my hand so I start with the leading edge again. I find leaving the cassette on til its obn the spool and then cutting off, the cassette gets in the way.

    second the let the film rest if poss, but 35mm has a reasonable length leader in most cameras so I often forceibly put a correct curl on it if there is still any reverse curl.

    As to keeping the dust off, I have a squirty bottle with photoflo mix in, and after I have hung the negs up I wash them down with this, and then get out the darkroom and let them dry. Sticky drying negs collect dust!

  3. #13

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    Film never gets stuck on metal reels. It just becomes a tangled, twisted mess instead.
    In life you only get one great dog, one great car, and one great woman. Pet the dog. Drive the car. Make love to the woman. Don't mix them up.

  4. #14

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    Yeah, I thought since it was so easy doing it with a 24 exp roll, that a 36 should not have been much different. Also, is it okay to touch the base side of the film, or should I avoid getting my hands on the film surface (noticed a nasty finger print on the edge of a frame)

  5. #15

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    It's best to avoid if possible, but touching either side is ok, but your hands must be clean, and absolutely dry, the dry part may be hard to achieve in a changing bag.

  6. #16
    StoneNYC's Avatar
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    Developed my first roll... Poor Paterson Reel loading technique ...

    Also, you can probably let the film come all the way out and around one time as the film emulsion faces in. That is if you have that problem again


    ~Stone

    Mamiya: 7 II, RZ67 Pro II / Canon: 1V, AE-1, 5DmkII / Kodak: No 1 Pocket Autographic, No 1A Pocket Autographic | Sent w/ iPhone using Tapatalk
    ~Stone | "...of course, that's just my opinion. I could be wrong." ~Dennis Miller

  7. #17
    Rick A's Avatar
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    Working inside a changing bag adds one degree of difficulty, moisture( perspiration from your hands), that can cause(almost always) film to not want to load into a plastic reel. This is most prevalent with 36 exposure rolls, due to the added length of film.
    Rick A
    Argentum aevum

  8. #18
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
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    Practice with a 36exp roll in the changing bag. Wash your hands well with soap, and make sure they are absolutely dry. There can be no moisture at all on the Paterson reels when you load film, or it will stick to the reel like gorilla glue. I have had exactly the problem you're having when it's summer time in Minnesota, with hot weather 80-100 degrees F and 90% humidity. An alternative is to use stainless steel reels, but they don't exactly load themselves either. They are not susceptible to moisture issues like plastic reels are, though, since you don't have to slide the film into them; they load from the center.

    Dust on the base side can usually be cleaned off if you soak the film again. Sometimes it comes off the emulsion side too.

    When you have finished washing your film after the fixing step, using a good wetting agent is key. Some wetting agents, like the 'End of Run' from Sprint, advises to remove the liquid that remains on the film with a sponge. Others advise to simply just hang. In my experience, the only way I can get virtually dust free negatives is to use the Sprint method.
    Some will advise against that method, because they are afraid to scratch the film. That is a valid concern, and you must be very careful doing it. I have not had a problem yet after about five years and a few hundred rolls of film, but I might be lucky. The benefit is that practically all my negatives are completely dust free and I don't have to spot my prints nearly as much as before.

    Good luck!
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

  9. #19

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    Once you kink film it is nearly impossible to load correctly with either plastic or metal reels. What I have found that does sometimes work is to start loading the reel from the opposite (unkinked) end of the film.

    BTW it does require a bit of effort to make a GOOD cup of tea. My grandmother was from England and she taught me how to make a good cup of tea. And for god's sake don't use a tea bag. The tea leaves in tea bags is cut too finely and therefore the tea rapidly loses its aroma. By the time you purchase tea bags the tea's aroma is mostly gone.
    Last edited by Gerald C Koch; 04-17-2013 at 09:34 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    A rock pile ceases to be a rock pile the moment a single man contemplates it, bearing within him the image of a cathedral.

    ~Antoine de Saint-Exupery

  10. #20
    StoneNYC's Avatar
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    Developed my first roll... Poor Paterson Reel loading technique ...

    Quote Originally Posted by Gerald C Koch View Post

    BTW it does require a bit of effort to make a GOOD cup of tea. My grandmother was from Birmingham England and she taught me how to make a good cup of tea. And for god's sake don't use a tea bag.
    Agreed! Loose leaf or no leaf!




    ~Stone

    Mamiya: 7 II, RZ67 Pro II / Canon: 1V, AE-1, 5DmkII / Kodak: No 1 Pocket Autographic, No 1A Pocket Autographic | Sent w/ iPhone using Tapatalk
    ~Stone | "...of course, that's just my opinion. I could be wrong." ~Dennis Miller

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