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  1. #31
    StoneNYC's Avatar
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    Developed my first roll... Poor Paterson Reel loading technique ...

    Quote Originally Posted by Dinesh View Post
    Don't concern yourself with trivial details like accuracy, just keep posting away as fast as you can!
    The main part I don't understand is how you can not use photoflow and only wipe the non-emulsion side and not have spots. It doesn't mean it's not possible but I don't understand it.

    Also keep picking on me I'm sure it's helpful to the OP


    ~Stone

    Mamiya: 7 II, RZ67 Pro II / Canon: 1V, AE-1, 5DmkII / Kodak: No 1 Pocket Autographic, No 1A Pocket Autographic | Sent w/ iPhone using Tapatalk
    ~Stone | "...of course, that's just my opinion. I could be wrong." ~Dennis Miller

  2. #32
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
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    Stone,

    Foma and Efke films have very soft emulsions. You wouldn't want to touch them when wet. Fuji Acros is not as bad, but susceptible to damage in my experience. Kodak and Ilford are very tough emulsions, and I haven't had a single scratch in five years when using a soft rubber edge to wipe the excess moisture off either base side or emulsion side.

    It's about technique and finding something that works. My negs are virtually dust free and I print 11x14 from 35mm with usually no more than two or three spots per print. Works for me. I learned my technique from a portraitist that has been in business for longer than I've been alive, and he himself had a mentor and teacher with similar long background and experience. It helps to look beyond the internet, strike up friendships with people you admire and respect, and learn from them. That way you know you get good information.

    Developing film is not rocket science, but lots of things along the way can go wrong. The devil is in the details.

    - Thomas


    Quote Originally Posted by StoneNYC View Post
    The main part I don't understand is how you can not use photoflow and only wipe the non-emulsion side and not have spots. It doesn't mean it's not possible but I don't understand it.

    Also keep picking on me I'm sure it's helpful to the OP


    ~Stone

    Mamiya: 7 II, RZ67 Pro II / Canon: 1V, AE-1, 5DmkII / Kodak: No 1 Pocket Autographic, No 1A Pocket Autographic | Sent w/ iPhone using Tapatalk
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

  3. #33
    cliveh's Avatar
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    When you loaded the camera you probably wasted about 6" of film not including the leader. If you therefore leave some film sticking out the cassette when you rewind the camera, or use a leader extractor if it has wound all the way back in (auto rewind). You can then cut the leader off and start loading the film past the ball bearings in the spiral (in the light) before you put it in the changing bag (make sure the core is already iside the spiral) before putting it in the bag with the tank and inner lid. In the bag, pull out all the rest of the film from the cassette, load the spiral and rip the end of the film from your cassette using your finger nails. Finish loading and secure in tank with the inner lid on.

    “The contemplation of things as they are, without error or confusion, without substitution or imposture, is in itself a nobler thing than a whole harvest of invention”

    Francis Bacon

  4. #34
    MattKing's Avatar
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    FWIW, Kodak Photoflo 200 has worked well for me for 40+ years.

    I have the benefit of clean, relatively soft tap water and I measure it carefully and dilute it at about 1:250 for use.

    In recent times I've added a portion of isopropyl alcohol to the diluting water, which speeds drying.

    I dry the film by hanging it over a bathtub, with the shower curtain pulled. On the few days a year when the humidity here is unusually low I steam up the shower area first before hanging the film.

    I never squeegee the film near the image area. I will use my Photo-flo wetted fingers to squeegee the two ends to remove excess liquid.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  5. #35

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    Thanks. I forgot to invert after using the photoflo, merely dunked the film in and pulled it out. Still trying to figure out what the scratches are in the frame I posted.

  6. #36
    StoneNYC's Avatar
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    Developed my first roll... Poor Paterson Reel loading technique ...

    Quote Originally Posted by Thomas Bertilsson View Post
    Stone,

    Foma and Efke films have very soft emulsions. You wouldn't want to touch them when wet. Fuji Acros is not as bad, but susceptible to damage in my experience. Kodak and Ilford are very tough emulsions, and I haven't had a single scratch in five years when using a soft rubber edge to wipe the excess moisture off either base side or emulsion side.

    It's about technique and finding something that works. My negs are virtually dust free and I print 11x14 from 35mm with usually no more than two or three spots per print. Works for me. I learned my technique from a portraitist that has been in business for longer than I've been alive, and he himself had a mentor and teacher with similar long background and experience. It helps to look beyond the internet, strike up friendships with people you admire and respect, and learn from them. That way you know you get good information.

    Developing film is not rocket science, but lots of things along the way can go wrong. The devil is in the details.

    - Thomas
    I'm trying to find real people in my area, so far just one guy, we met up once but I'm looking forward to the beach meet up thing in New England ... Hopefully I'll be able to make it.


    ~Stone

    Mamiya: 7 II, RZ67 Pro II / Canon: 1V, AE-1, 5DmkII / Kodak: No 1 Pocket Autographic, No 1A Pocket Autographic | Sent w/ iPhone using Tapatalk
    ~Stone | "...of course, that's just my opinion. I could be wrong." ~Dennis Miller

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