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  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by HTF III View Post
    In all my years I had never heard of ferrotyping fluid.
    Seems I used the wrong term; apparently I was thinking of "glazing solution". I have an ancient bottle of the Ilford stuff that I scored with a larger auction lot.

    Contrary to my above advice about no hardener in paper fix, there's an instruction manual I ran across while looking for "ferrotyping fluid" that recommends hardener for ferrotyping to aid in the release. However, it still does make it very hard (certainly impossible without hypo-clear) to achieve an archival wash.

  2. #12

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    As it turns out with my experiment to use this big jug of stock solution in post #1, I mixed up some at 1:5 last night, and used it to make some contact proofs. The working solution turned out cloudy and fairly stinky. But it DID seem to fix OK, although I have no idea if it's leaving residual silver. It would be a shame to just get rid of it, as I sure do have a lot of it.

  3. #13
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    You can get residual-silver testing kits...

  4. #14

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    I know. I just googled you mentioned. I ended up at Photographer's Formulary. But its service life is so short, I'm not going to buy it. Probably the best thing is to just get a few packages of Kodak Fixer, and use it as a second fixing bath to this free stuff. Thanks for your help on this.
    Well I see it's just about dark outside right now, so it's time to set up the trays and get back to my tests.

  5. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by HTF III View Post
    As it turns out with my experiment to use this big jug of stock solution in post #1, I mixed up some at 1:5 last night, and used it to make some contact proofs. The working solution turned out cloudy and fairly stinky. But it DID seem to fix OK, although I have no idea if it's leaving residual silver. It would be a shame to just get rid of it, as I sure do have a lot of it.
    If the working solution was cloudy then it is beginning to sulfurize. Nothing can be done to save it and it is best to chuck it. The sulfur that is being formed will stick to film and prints and cannot be removed. Sorry
    A rock pile ceases to be a rock pile the moment a single man contemplates it, bearing within him the image of a cathedral.

    ~Antoine de Saint-Exupery

  6. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gerald C Koch View Post
    If the working solution was cloudy then it is beginning to sulfurize. Nothing can be done to save it and it is best to chuck it. The sulfur that is being formed will stick to film and prints and cannot be removed. Sorry
    Thank you for your reply. When I saw it, I went it and looked at the bottle of fixer that has sat idle for several days now. So I have a new question. The cloudiness has settled to the bottom 25% of the jug. If I poured off the clear, what would I have? Would it be fixer, or just some unknown solution stripped of its constituant chemical, of no use at all?

  7. #17

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    Once the fixer starts to sulfurize the reaction will continue. So pouring off any clear fix only delays things slightly. An acid solution of thiosulfate is unstable. Sodium sulfite is added as a preservative as it reacts with any colloidal sulfur to form thiosulfate. In the process the sulfite gets used up. When it does then sulfurization begins.
    Last edited by Gerald C Koch; 04-22-2013 at 11:53 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    A rock pile ceases to be a rock pile the moment a single man contemplates it, bearing within him the image of a cathedral.

    ~Antoine de Saint-Exupery

  8. #18

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    Thank you Mr Koch. I seem to favor seeing your name next to a reply, as some others I've come to respect. Here's my plan. I've got a bunch of outdated film, paper, fixer, along with the other customary supplies and chemistry in useable condition. Oh, and about 5 tablespoons of KBr and sa jar of Potassium Ferricyanide. And I'm just going to shoot mundane stupid pointless subjects to burn all this stuff on, and make prints that are at least somewhat permanent. And out of it, I expect something worth pinning on the wall. Maybe even a polished and invigorated technique. Beats just hauling all this away as total waste.

  9. #19

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    Try adding 20 g/l of sodium sulfite to working strength fixer. This may stop the sulfurization for awhile. This fixer should be good enough for your intended purpose.
    A rock pile ceases to be a rock pile the moment a single man contemplates it, bearing within him the image of a cathedral.

    ~Antoine de Saint-Exupery

  10. #20

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    To put a little night cap on this story, My experimentation with salvaging this old acid rapid fixer concentrate, it appears it is just not going to happen. After letting my working mixture gallon sit a few days and settle out, I thought I was home free. I poured off the clear solution , saved it, and discarded the scummy stuff. Guess what? The clear solution I poured off the top, is now cloudy itself in it's new bottle. I recall an experiment my 11th grade chemistry teacher had done by making a supersaturated solution of some common chemical, with help from the bunsen burner. He had managed to mix an incredible amount of some powdered chemical in a little test tube of water. Sitting on the table undisturbed it was nice and clear. As soon as he bumped the test tube, a ton of the powdered chemical reappeared and settled like a snow blizzard.
    And so it is as it seems, with this old rapid fixer concentrate. I have an idea I could go through generations of letting the sulfur settle out, and each time it will cloud up again. It still fixes paper, but it's not worth the contamination it will cause to them.

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