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  1. #11
    Rick A's Avatar
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    My final rinse(wash) is LFN diluted one drop in 16 ounces distilled water plus one capful 90% Isopropyl alcohol. I havent had any problems with spotting or other marks since I started using the mix. Soak film for a minimum of 30 seconds then shake the excess liquid from the film before removing from reel and hanging. For sheet film, simply hang to dry.
    Rick A
    Argentum aevum

  2. #12

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    The alcohol per se won't damage film, but additives can. And it is possible that too much water might be present, though that would equate to false labeling. Never use hardware or paint store alchohol,
    where adulteration with excess water is common. I either use pure methyl alchohol (expensive) or an
    official film cleaner like PEC-20.

  3. #13

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    Yes, you can use a 'photographic emulsion cleaner' like PEC-12 at at least $10 for 4 oz, but I have a sneaking suspicion all it is is denatured alcohol. They sure smell identical.

  4. #14
    Chris Lange's Avatar
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    I use PEC12 and DeltaOne's film cleaner, they work really well, especially with the non-abrasive lint free PEC-Pads you can get online. I find q-tips leave fuzzies behind if you aren't really really careful.
    See my work at my website CHRISTOPHER LANGE PHOTOGRAPHY

    or my snaps at my blog MINIMUM DENSITY
    --
    If you don't have it, then you don't have it.

  5. #15
    AgX
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    Quote Originally Posted by Old Fart View Post
    I can't say if Isopropyl can or won't damage the emulsion on photographic film, but I don't use it because of the residue that it can leave behind. I can only speak for the Isopropyl's that I've tested. To test, place a drop of the Isopropyl on a piece of clean glass. Once it has dried, examine the glass with a loupe. You "may" find that the Isopropyl has left behind a residue on the glass. If present, you may decide that you don't want this residue on your film.
    That is a good point!

    I experienced such at my last batch. I did buy it from bulk at the pharmacy and I thought the residue was some oil by which the funnel they used may have been contaminated.
    I thus rejected mine for lens cleaning.

    Such an evaporation test should be done with all solvents used for cleaning etc.

  6. #16

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    No, PEC-12 is not simply alchohol. It will remove all kinds of gummy gooey adhesive-like substances that ordinary alcohol won't touch, like tape residue. It's essentially a safer replacement for the nasty 1:1:1 movie film cleaners, aka "safety solvent" that wasn't very safe! (non-flammable, but otherwise...)
    I use PEC-12 in conjunction with lint-free microfiber wipes, just like you would use on a lens. The 3M
    lens ones are the best.

  7. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by Alex Muir View Post
    I have bee troubled with drying marks on my 35mm B&W negatives recently. I am working on a solution, but have some affected films I want to print. I bought a spray of cleaning solution which is meant for cleansing skin and equipment by professional manicurists. It is mainly Isopropyl, with some additives including a blue colour . I couldn't find straight isopropyl alcohol. It works when applied to the film base and evaporates quickly. Is the alcohol likely to cause long term damage? Thanks, Alex.
    If you use distilled water with a couple drops of PhotoFlo for the final rinse, you won't have drying marks. There are, or were, commercial film "rapid dryers" which were isopropyl, but some goop from a manicurists... not on my film.

  8. #18

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    A lot of the products manicurists use would literally be illegal to sell in a paint store in any quantity.
    Some of these things contain solvents that will attack acetate-based films. I once spoke to an ambulence medic who had to do CPR on six women in nail salons in just two months. Ever wonder why the gals who work in those places get so ditzy?

  9. #19

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    Thanks for the replies. I will look for the high percentage isopropyl. I have only recently acquired the drying mark problem, and I'm sure I will be able to lose it again by tightening up final wash procedures. It sounds like a pharmacy is the place to try, although Boots, which is a very large chain in the UK, didn't have any. A smaller, local store may be a better bet. The blue stuff has been put away out of reach! Alex

  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alex Muir View Post
    Boots didn't have any. A smaller, local store may be a better bet.
    Boots has gone downhill when it comes to supplying even the most basic of stuff. Thanks to the winos and general "OMG, that stuff is dangerous", they won't sell you meths either. Your best bet might be a decent local hardware store (not B&Q, although they may have it), or if you have a local trade supplier that deals in wood finishes, try them.

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