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  1. #21
    MattKing's Avatar
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    I use the 70% Isopropyl alcohol to make up a photo-flo stock solution which I store and then further dilute immediately before use.

    The stock solution is 1 oz photo-flo added to 8.5 oz of the 70% Isopropyl alcohol.

    That stock is further diluted 1 + 24 for use.

    I have had no problems.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  2. #22

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    Hi Alex,

    I'd resoak the negs in tepid water, add a few drops of wetting agent (Photo-flo, Ilfotol etc, just enough to form a couple of bubbles), rub off any drying marks with a soft, clean fingertip and hang to dry for a few hours. Excess wetting agent can leave worse marks than none. Don't use washing-up liquid or liquid soap! If the marks are on the shiny side of the film, take a soft, clean, cotton cloth (the ones supplied for cleaning specs would do nicely), breathe on the film and gently wipe away the condensate. You might even be able to remove the deposits with a dry, grease-free fingertip. Be careful not to scratch the film and don't try this on the emulsion (dull) side of the film.

    I'm not sure I fancy chucking alcohol into my final wash water; it's probably a waste anyway. I'm in a hard water area and I just use a few drops of Ilfotol - nothing more. I rarely have problems with drying marks.

    Cheers,
    kevs
    testing...

  3. #23

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    I used about a 30% solution of isopropyl from the drug store to help quicken the drying of film. It worked okay. I used to use ISO_HEAT which you use to dehydrate gas lines which was almost 100% alcohol, but after 2 years or so the added some oily stuff that totally ruined the films. Same with the blue nail cleaner, it has amyl acetate, among with some oils in it --I wouldn't trust it-- probably melt the film

    rob

  4. #24
    Patrick Robert James's Avatar
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    There are many ways to skin a cat as they say.

    i have used 91% Isopropyl in the past to dry negatives faster, just don't apply heat or the negs will cloud.

    To get rid of water spots I use 91% on a microfiber and rub gently in one direction. Works like a charm.

  5. #25
    michael stevens's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alex Muir View Post
    It sounds like a pharmacy is the place to try, although Boots, which is a very large chain in the UK, didn't have any. A smaller, local store may be a better bet.
    I tried several local chemists as well as Boots in an attempt to buy IPA a little while ago and nobody had any. One said there was a national shortage(!) and another took my number in order to let me know when it was back in stock, but never rang me back. A few years ago I worked as a picture framer and we used to have no trouble buying it for picture cleaning. Maybe the laws have changed.

    Anyhow, I found it was very quick, easy and cheap to get it from eBay instead. No wonder the high streets are closing down!

  6. #26

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    Drying marks are generally on the back of the neg, which is relatively hard, and can be gently removed using a microfibre cloth over one finger, dabbed in clean tapwater. Before it dries again (which takes only seconds), dry it gently with a dry bit of the cloth. Old linen handkerchieves used to be recommended in the 1960s, but microfibre cloths are much better (yes, I am that old).

    I read somewhere in the Ilford technical stuff recently that drying marks are more likely if you don't use a stop bath. I don't know why this would be, but recently I stopped using a stop (if you see what I mean), and drying marks have appeared in my life again.

  7. #27
    Roger Cole's Avatar
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    It will not damage it but can leave a residue. I've used 70% (when I happened to have 70% on hand, yes 90% would be better) as a quick dry aid back when I sometimes needed that. Soak for a minute and hang to dry and it will dry much, much faster. I always went back and washed again and dried normally later though I'm not sure that was needed. It does leave a residue (at least 70% does) as mentioned, so I've wanted to wash that off. It wipes off easily enough when dry, but I figured a re-wash wouldn't hurt. Negatives I processed in the 70s this way are still ok.

  8. #28

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    Sigma-Aldrich will sell you 99.9% . They have less pure also. Not inexpensive.

  9. #29
    Steve Smith's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jonathan R View Post
    Drying marks are generally on the back of the neg, which is relatively hard, and can be gently removed using a microfibre cloth over one finger, dabbed in clean tapwater.
    I too have found that they are usually just on the back. A finger in a cotton glove usually removes them.


    Steve.
    "People who say things won't work are a dime a dozen. People who figure out how to make things work are worth a fortune" - Dave Rat.

  10. #30
    dpurdy's Avatar
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    I find plain water works better than alcohol on most spots on film and on print surfaces. I threw a lot of prints away before I figured that out. You can use alcohol after you clean a spot with water to make it dry faster. The only time I reach first for alcohol is when I have an LFN residue left on my neg.
    Anyway that is my experience.
    Dennis

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