Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,481   Posts: 1,542,702   Online: 821
      
Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 30
  1. #1

    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    276

    Isopropyl alcohol. Will it damage negatives?

    I have bee troubled with drying marks on my 35mm B&W negatives recently. I am working on a solution, but have some affected films I want to print. I bought a spray of cleaning solution which is meant for cleansing skin and equipment by professional manicurists. It is mainly Isopropyl, with some additives including a blue colour . I couldn't find straight isopropyl alcohol. It works when applied to the film base and evaporates quickly. Is the alcohol likely to cause long term damage? Thanks, Alex.

  2. #2

    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Cincinnati Ohio USA
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    670
    I would not use it if it is blue. We do not know what the blue is and it may cause damage. Try the hardware store for pure isopropyl alcohol (sometimes sold under the name of 2-Propanol). Also for removing drying marks I have just used a Q-tip or small paint brush dipped in distilled water. It does the job and only takes a short while to dry as it in only a spot and hot the whole negative that is wet.

  3. #3

    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Sydney
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,349
    Images
    84
    Kodak did recommend pure Isopropyl for film cleaning. I'm not sure how good the blue stuff would be as we don't know what's in it. Depending on your country the pure stuff shouldn't be that hard to buy - I got some from ebay, I've also heard it's available in electronic shops for cleaning inside computers.
    For future film washing after developing, distilled water is very good. Just use it for the final soak.

  4. #4

    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Minneapolis, MN US
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,267
    Images
    4
    It should be relatively easy to find 90% Iso Alcohol in any pharmacy or drug store. The other 10% is water. I would give that a try. There is also 70% commonly available (perhaps labeled as "rubbing alcohol) but I'd try the 90%.

    Iso Heet (sold as gas line antifreeze) is 99% iso alcohol according to the msds. The other 1% is a "proprietary additive"; which could be anything.
    "Far more critical than what we know or do not know is what we do not want to know." - Eric Hoffer

  5. #5
    AgX
    AgX is offline

    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Germany
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    8,585
    There are two grades of Isopropyl on offer: 70% (the rest is water) or 100%.
    Chose the pure one.

  6. #6

    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Switzerland
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    381
    Images
    91
    and remember, it's best not to mix your drinks.

  7. #7
    Mike Wilde's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Misissauaga Canada
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,939
    Images
    29
    Newspaper photogs back in the film day would add isopropyl alcohol about 50/50 in the final rinse with distilled water.

    That way the film dried faster with the higher vapor pressure of the iospropyl in the mix.
    my real name, imagine that.

  8. #8
    Bruce Osgood's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Brooklyn, N.Y. USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,433
    Images
    45
    Do not use the blue stuff and do not use Rubbing Alcohol. Isopropyl alcohol is cheap and can be bought in just about any drug store here in the US as 90% Isopropyl Alcohol, as already said the remaining 10% is water. There is also a Kodak product called Foto Flo made for drying film evenly and without marks.

  9. #9
    jp498's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Owls Head ME
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,467
    Images
    74
    I use the 90% rubbing alcohol from the drugstore and have for years without problem. I do a final rinse of negatives in distilled water. Then my bottle of alcohol has a pinhole punched in the safety seal so I can spray on a coat of alcohol. I think it works better than photoflo in removing surface tension water drops and it helps things dry much faster. (so I can scan)

  10. #10

    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Oklahoma
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    588
    I can't say if Isopropyl can or won't damage the emulsion on photographic film, but I don't use it because of the residue that it can leave behind. I can only speak for the Isopropyl's that I've tested. To test, place a drop of the Isopropyl on a piece of clean glass. Once it has dried, examine the glass with a loupe. You "may" find that the Isopropyl has left behind a residue on the glass. If present, you may decide that you don't want this residue on your film.
    "Lo único de lo que el mundo no se cansará nunca es de exageración." Salvador Dalí

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin