Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,302   Posts: 1,536,240   Online: 739
      
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 16 of 16
  1. #11
    MattKing's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Delta, British Columbia, Canada
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    12,285
    Images
    60
    I think I understand why the OP might have been confused.

    The indicator in stop bath changes colour when the stop bath becomes exhausted. That change is easily seen in normal room light. Additionally, it is advantageous if the colour change is easily seen under darkroom safelight. In the case of both the Kodak and Ilford products, the colour change is easily seen under darkroom safelight.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  2. #12

    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    96
    I use Rollei Citrin Stop batch (RCS). It turns an opaque black in normal light - there is no question when it expires!

  3. #13
    cmacd123's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Stittsville, Ontario
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    1,014
    under the typical OC or 902 safe-light the Ilford or Kodak bath looks clear, and as it turns purple it starts to look black under the yellow light. in white light it goes from yellow to Purple. once it starts to change, time to mix up a fresh trayful.
    Charles MacDonald
    aa508@ncf.ca
    I still live just beyond the fringe in Stittsville

  4. #14

    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Greenville SC
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    269
    FWIW, I was curious about this too a while back, so I just set aside a little developer and stop bath and slowly mixed them. The color slowly turned muddy to purple as I added more developer. I suggest you try this simple "experiment". Then you will know exactly what to look for.

  5. #15
    Truzi's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Ohio, USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,024
    Quote Originally Posted by edcculus View Post
    FWIW, I was curious about this too a while back, so I just set aside a little developer and stop bath and slowly mixed them. The color slowly turned muddy to purple as I added more developer. I suggest you try this simple "experiment". Then you will know exactly what to look for.
    Great idea, and odd that I didn't think of it myself because that is something I'd normally do. I think I was trying to save the stop, but am certainly not against sacrificing some to learn.
    I've about 500ml of 9-month-old D-76 that is forming some weird strings, plus I'll be mixing fresh developer soon and running some test rolls. I'll dump this into some a bit of old 9-month-old stop so I can finally see what it looks like when exhausted.
    Truzi

  6. #16

    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Greenville SC
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    269
    You really don't even have to sacrifice that much. I took probably 50mL of stop bath and slowly poured in some mixed developer until I saw a change. In my case I'm using Kodak Indicator and it turned purple. Before I did this, I was saving stop bath after printing, but dumping it when developing film. Now that I know this, I dump the stop bath from the container into a beaker. If its turned purple, I dump it. If not, it goes back into the storage container. I don't shoot or print as much as some do, but I've never actually had a batch turn yet.

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin