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  1. #1

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    Yellow filter on Tmax question

    With Tri-X I use a yellow filter to keep the clouds from blending in with the sky. Will I need to do the same with Tmx or tmy?

    I've seen a lot of posts saying that tmax is balanced so that a yellow filter is not needed for natural tones, I'd just like to know if that includes clouds.

    Thanks

  2. #2

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    It's a very small difference, so I'd say it depends on what yellow filter you are used to. If it is a very light yellow, maybe you can get away without it. But if you're using say a common Wratten #8 (light yellow) or anything stronger you'll still need it.

    Best to test for yourself, of course.

  3. #3
    Mainecoonmaniac's Avatar
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    You can also try an orange or red filter for greater separation of clouds and sky. Try the orange filter first.
    "Photography, like surfing, is an infinite process, a constantly evolving exploration of life."
    Aaron Chang

  4. #4
    ROL
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    Quote Originally Posted by horacekenneth View Post
    With Tri-X I use a yellow filter to keep the clouds from blending in with the sky. Will I need to do the same with Tmx or tmy?
    As previously mentioned, you are unlikely to notice much difference among panchromatic films. Stronger yellow filters will cut more of the blue light though, allowing for increased definition of defined cloud structure against against a blue sky. This will be of great assistance to you when you print the negative, giving you both a head start on darkening clear sky to communicate its character as you visualize it, and revealing cloud composition.

    Quote Originally Posted by horacekenneth View Post
    I've seen a lot of posts saying that tmax is balanced so that a yellow filter is not needed for natural tones, I'd just like to know if that includes clouds.
    What you have read, or how you have presented it here is unspecific nonsense. Yellow filters (not orange, not red – unless your visualization includes unnatural portrayals) will not dramatically affect landscape mid tones, with the only important exceptions being lightening yellowish elements and removing the blue from deep shadows. In red rock country, a green filter may be used quite effectively to assist with skies, lighten (green) foliage, and affect "natural" landscape tones buy darkening them. Please read the filter sections (and the rest) of The Negative and/or Natural Light Photography, both by Adams, who knew and communicated these concepts better and more completely than anyone on these forums, including me.
    Last edited by ROL; 04-29-2013 at 11:09 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  5. #5
    jp498's Avatar
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    tmy2 does seem to have a little bit of yellow filter built in compared to tri-x and it's noticeable in skin tones/blemishes/freckles to me. If you're after skies, don't bother with a light yellow. Go straight to the deeper yellow or orange.

  6. #6

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    When I used the film it appears to take the place of a light yellow filter in regards to sky tone.
    RJ

  7. #7
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
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    From Kodak's Tech pub on their web site:

    * The blue sensitivity of KODAK PROFESSIONAL
    T-MAX Films is slightly less than that of other Kodak
    panchromatic black-and-white films. This enables the
    response of this film to be closer to the response of the
    human eye. Therefore, blues may be recorded as slightly
    darker tones with this film—a more natural rendition.

    That explains why some see the film as rendering sky blue a little darker than Tri-X.

    The moral of the story is - try TMax 400 with and without a yellow filter, and see which you like best.
    Last edited by Thomas Bertilsson; 04-29-2013 at 02:26 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

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  8. #8

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    Thanks guys.

  9. #9

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    The blue sensitivity of KODAK PROFESSIONAL
    T-MAX Films is slightly less than that of other Kodak
    panchromatic black-and-white films
    The operative word here is slightly.
    A rock pile ceases to be a rock pile the moment a single man contemplates it, bearing within him the image of a cathedral.

    ~Antoine de Saint-Exupery

  10. #10
    Bill Burk's Avatar
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    I have often made the claim that I don't "need" a yellow filter with TMY-2. Yes it is slight. If clouds are important, you would still want to use filters. But you can get away without it.

    Here is an example photograph that led me to that conclusion. No filter. 1/300 f/16 The day I took the picture, I didn't even notice clouds in the sky. I expected blank white, and made no adjustments when printing. Galerie 2.

    Dad and the twins, Laguna


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