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  1. #11

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    I'd already thought of that, Allen. I'm even thinking of putting a lawyer in the closet just in case!

    The jars will be stored away from the home, in a commercial building where my darkroom is located, in a locked closet to which only I will have access.

  2. #12

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    I seriously doubt that today's children make any connection between a Mason jar and food. I would be more worried by what is kept under the sink just at the right level for small children. These contianers usually have brightly colored labels that are very attractive to little ones.
    A rock pile ceases to be a rock pile the moment a single man contemplates it, bearing within him the image of a cathedral.

    ~Antoine de Saint-Exupery

  3. #13

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    One thing I'm not quite sure about....

    I thought about using mason jar as well for chemical storage. My concern is that lids that comes with these jars seem like they are really meant for one time use only.... After the lid and the screw top has been tightened down and stored like this for a while, the lid basically glues itself to the jar. An only way I can get these off is to pry it off, which deforms the lid often pretty badly. The screw top seem too flimsy to torque down now deformed lids, also.

    Have anyone actually used these for long time storage or in use that they may be opened and closed multiple times?
    Develop, stop, fix.... wait.... where's my film?

  4. #14
    George Nova Scotia's Avatar
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    I use mason jars for my homemade jam. Yes the lids are made for one time use - for food. According to what I've read the rubber ring vulcanises when heated. For jam the jars are put in a gently boiling water bath for 15-20 minutes. You might try boiling the lids for a while to harder the rubber. The ring isn't meant to hold the lids tight for jam storage. That step and the created vacuum seals the lid tight to glass. The retaining ring just holds the lid in place for the water bath.

    George


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  5. #15

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    I routinely keep such chemicals as sodium sulfite and sodium carbonate, which I buy in large quamtiities, in Mason jars. To get an airtight seal just snug the band down gently. You don't need to use a torque wrench on them. You can buy new lids which are not expenive.

    For canning these jars depend on a vacuum formed during the canning process. Air pressure keeps them tight. Once the jars cool the bands can be removed since they serve no other purpose.
    A rock pile ceases to be a rock pile the moment a single man contemplates it, bearing within him the image of a cathedral.

    ~Antoine de Saint-Exupery

  6. #16
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    United States Plastic Corp. Lima, Ohio

    1. Do not use Mason Jars for chemical storage unless you are using plastic lids or caps. Besides glass jars are too easy to break and crack.
    2. I have toyed with the problem of chemical storage for some time. I have used any and all types of containers and I have learned the hard way that uniform storage containers is the way to go.

    I purchase all my storage containers for my chemicals from USPC, they are inexpensive; plus they provide outstanding service to you when needed.

    I use the following storage containers for all my chemicals and reordering extras is a snap.

    #66737 32oz/950cc packer jar with 53/400 wide mouth opening @ $00.84 ea.
    #66735 16.9oz/500cc packer jar with 53/400 wide mouth opening @ $00.46 ea.
    #66339 53/400 caps with liners, for jars listed above @ $00.14 ea.
    #66734 8.5oz/250cc packer jar with 45/400 wide mouth opening @ $00.30 ea.
    #66156 45/400 caps with liners, for jars listed above @ $00.11 ea.

    You can start with a small order and add to it, replacing all your odd and end containers with uniform jars and bottles designed for chemical storage.

    Also, USPC have a huge line of plastic labware at very low cost.

    I also purchase the following for storing my stock and working solutions.
    #66150 32oz round poly-e jugs/ with white cap @ $00.64 ea.

    I was able to completely uniform and clean up my chemical storage area for as low as $60.00; over a two month period.

    KennyE

  7. #17

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    I don't use mason jars in the DR, but do use them a lot for dry food storage, no problems with the lids sticking or removing and replacing them.
    For dry chem storage, there is no reason IME that they shouldn't work well.

    +1 on container standardization for the DR, my standard is rectangular bottles to maximize shelf space, but I've not standardized the source, FWIW.

  8. #18
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    bdial, in part I agree. Mason jars were invented for canning. But even in canning, whether it is at home or industrial, those lids and caps do rust and corrode. With chemical storage, it just may do it a bit faster. Glass is good, but in a busy dark room they can hit the floor in a flash. Chemical and glass every where.

    Also, USPC does have rectangular chemical storage bottles. I purchase some for that reason as well. I have a narrow rectangular cabinet and I wanted to maximize its use. Here is the information if you want to purchase some. They are inexpensive and the caps comes with the bottles.

    #66560 16oz wide mouth oblong bottle cap size 43/400 @ $00.71 ea.
    #66559 8oz @ $00.58 ea.

    I am a retired researcher, it is my first passion and my wife is my second, with everything else falling somewhere far behind. I collect information, lots of it.

    KennyE

  9. #19
    fotch's Avatar
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    In fifty years of darkroom work, I never have drop or broke glass of any kind. Is this just fobia some have?
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  10. #20

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    I have no problem with glass. I'm going to use mason jars for now - but will take KennyE's advice for the longer term and replace them when feasible with plastic jars.

    I still have some dry chemicals from the early 80's in plastic jars but with metal lids - they have held up very well, so again for now, I'm just going to use the mason jar lids.

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