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  1. #11

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    Since sulfuric acid is used all over the world as battery electrolyte it is probably the easiest of all the strong acids to obtain. So why worry about substitutes.
    A rock pile ceases to be a rock pile the moment a single man contemplates it, bearing within him the image of a cathedral.

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  2. #12

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    A substitute for sulfuric acid is pH- used for pools. It's sodium bisulfate. Perfect! Use 55g/l.
    Don't use a chelating agent as water softner in the bleach, it would chelate the permanganate rendering it useless...

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hexavalent View Post
    Sulfamic acid will merrily dissolve silver; it might just do a little more bleaching than desired.
    AFAIK Sulfamic Acid is used in Ilfochrome dye bleaches to get the low pH needed, so it must be compatible with Silver somehow...

    Quote Originally Posted by Gerald C Koch View Post
    Since sulfuric acid is used all over the world as battery electrolyte it is probably the easiest of all the strong acids to obtain.
    I am not worried about availability of Sulfuric Acid, but it's a dangerous liquid in the hand of imbeciles like me. Sulfamic Acid is cheap, easy to obtain and so much simpler to measure and use.

    Quote Originally Posted by Alessandro Serrao View Post
    A substitute for sulfuric acid is pH- used for pools. It's sodium bisulfate. Perfect! Use 55g/l.
    I like the idea ...

    Quote Originally Posted by Alessandro Serrao View Post
    Don't use a chelating agent as water softner in the bleach, it would chelate the permanganate rendering it useless...
    Look at the patent Stefan linked to. Most chelating agents will get oxidized by Permanganate, but evidently Polyphosphates don't, so they can be used to great advantage.
    Trying to be the best of whatever I am, even if what I am is no good.

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