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  1. #21

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    Quote Originally Posted by tadeo View Post
    I know it's out of topic my question but can't find where to start the thread since I just got in. My question is:
    Is there a negative film scanner for a Rollei 8cmx8cm film? These are negative films from 1950 and 1960 and I'm planning to design a book with those pics..
    Any help?
    If so, please reply to tadeopub@yahoo.com since is always on.. thanks!
    You can scan with a flatbed scanner, possibly an Imacon too (expensive!). Anything capable of doing 4x5 will also work, but you might have to make a cardboard or opaque plastic frame to fit in the carrier (if the scanner uses one). Your other option is a drum scanner. Most can handle quite large formats. But they are a PITA to get working on any current platform. You will end up having to buy a computer of 15 years ago with matching software, SCSI cables etc. The cables are very specific, and the software/hardware match has to be correct, too. These things were not made as plug and play. One of my friends is going through the drill, and he has been at it for weeks now, and still no complete success. If you can find a lab or private individual to do it for you, that would be worth serious consideration. If you want to do a book, then getting the best possible quality is worth the extra cost, and a flatbed might not cut it for you. Depends on what you are happy with.

  2. #22

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    Jul 2010
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    People look at a positive print or scan and say "that film is grainy." In actuality what they are seeing is the spaces between grains. To determine the amount of grain one must look at the film itself under a microscope! Actually there is a scientific way to measure granularity known as the RMS Granularity value. Koddak used to publish these values. For some reason Ilford chose not to.
    A rock pile ceases to be a rock pile the moment a single man contemplates it, bearing within him the image of a cathedral.

    ~Antoine de Saint-Exupery

  3. #23
    John Bragg's Avatar
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    Tri-X is my film of choice. I tried all the rest but still like it the best. Graininess is dependent on, amongst other things, developer choice, and how you use it. For me, it works best in HC-110H and gives crisp wonderful grain. It is THE standard by which all others are judged in my opinion.

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