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  1. #1

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    Kodak Tri-x black and White film?

    Hey guys,

    I noticed that Mcnew uses Tri-x Black and white film for his images. I went to B and H photo, it comes in 400asa. The grain in this film that good in 400 asa? if so.. WOW!! Can anyone confirm this?

    ToddB

  2. #2

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    Well, just because it is an ISO400 film doesn't automatically make it "grainy"

    I believe he uses MF, which by virtue of its size de-accentuates the effect of grain size

  3. #3
    Jim Noel's Avatar
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    the grain clumping is due to exposure, developer used, developing time and constant temperature. When all three are under control the grain clumps less and therefore is less visible.
    [FONT=Comic Sans MS]Films NOT Dead - Just getting fixed![/FONT]

  4. #4
    ColdEye's Avatar
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    Well you CAN expose it in a different iso ( I think the terms are push/pull). I metered and developed this for iso250, 35mm TriX.

    Click image for larger version. 

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  5. #5

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    Tri-X is a fine grain film despite the 400 speed. It isn't as fine grained as TMY, but it is pretty close, any many people prefer the look of its images.

  6. #6
    TheFlyingCamera's Avatar
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    Yes, Sanders is shooting his Tri-X in 120 and/or large format sizes (mostly 5x7 if memory serves). It also helps that at least with his nudes, he's shooting on a continuous white background that eliminates any texture that would show grain. And different developers will have different grain masking/emphasizing characteristics. Rodinal at 1:25 would emphasize the grain, but Pyrocat HD at 1:1:100 would mask it considerably.

  7. #7
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
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    Tri-X is a really good film with beautiful grain, and of course in medium format at the size normally displayed on the internet or books, you won't see grain at all unless you either tried to enhance it or screwed up (depending on how you like your film to look).
    You will find though, with time, that the results of your efforts will depend a lot more of what you and your brain put into it, how you light the scene, and how you treat and print your negatives, than your choice of film will. There is a LOT more to it than just using a particular film.
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

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  8. #8
    Richard Sintchak (rich815)'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Thomas Bertilsson View Post
    Tri-X is a really good film with beautiful grain, and of course in medium format at the size normally displayed on the internet or books, you won't see grain at all unless you either tried to enhance it or screwed up (depending on how you like your film to look).
    You will find though, with time, that the results of your efforts will depend a lot more of what you and your brain put into it, how you light the scene, and how you treat and print your negatives, than your choice of film will. There is a LOT more to it than just using a particular film.
    +1. That and I think way too many people underexpose, and/or more often overdevelop, Tri-X. It's all subjective though....
    -----------------------

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  9. #9
    MaximusM3's Avatar
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    Tri-X is as grainy as you want it to be. Lighting, exposure, development and printing techniques are all interconnected to achieve a desired look. I believe Mr. McNew rates it at 200 and uses HC110 dilution E. With medium format, good exposure and development, grain is barely perceptible on 20x24 prints.

  10. #10

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    they used to say tri x had a 7 speed latitude.
    it is as slow or fast as you want it
    and the grain is beautiful.
    not many films are like tri x

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