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Thread: Ilford SFX 200

  1. #11
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Robert Ley View Post
    How does one shoot this film with an IR filter such as the Hoya R72? Any problems with a dark red filter?


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    A dark red filter will produce minimal IR effect. In order to fully bring it out, it's best to use the SFX filter that Ilford makes (I think they still make it), which lets through only a narrow band of wavelengths to hit the sweet spot of the film.
    You'd have to be on a tripod, and use a meter as if the film was around ISO 1 to ISO 3 or so, and then bracket. Like with any IR film you will soon learn what works and what doesn't.

    I hope that helps.
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

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  2. #12
    Tony-S's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Thomas Bertilsson View Post
    A dark red filter will produce minimal IR effect. In order to fully bring it out, it's best to use the SFX filter that Ilford makes (I think they still make it), which lets through only a narrow band of wavelengths to hit the sweet spot of the film.
    The Cokin 007 is the same filter.

  3. #13
    polyglot's Avatar
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    I use a generic Chinese clone of the R72 (720nm lowpass) and SFX comes out well at EI2 with that filter.

    I also found that TTL metering with my Dynax 5 worked fine through the filter with this film (DX box speed 200) - your results will vary with the spectral sensitivity of your camera's meter so you might need to apply a consistent adjustment, e.g. by forcing the camera's ISO setting to something else.

  4. #14
    MattKing's Avatar
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    My entry in the Ilford APUG contest a few years ago was shot on unfiltered SFX 200.

    The slightly different spectral response is interesting to work with.
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    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

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  5. #15
    Truzi's Avatar
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    I've only shot a couple rolls, and do not have an IR filter (sorry, don't have a scanner to post pictures).

    I really like SFX. It does look like "normal" B&W without a filter, but seems to have a different "feel" to it.
    Truzi

  6. #16

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    Thanks for the exposure info on this film. I shot a few rolls of this film years ago, but forgot how I shot it. I have found a few frozen rolls of 120 that I think I might like to try and will probably try to process it in Thornton's two bath developer. Any other processing suggestions?


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  7. #17
    polyglot's Avatar
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    It fogs pretty quickly once expired, even frozen. You might want to give it an extra stop.

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