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  1. #21

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    yes/no... if you get them all say, within 20 seconds or less of each other, trust me, you can do this, then you can move them all into the water at the same time... let them sit in the dektol for 2.5 minutes, and developing should be the same between them, unnoticeable. when you take them all out, to the water wash, you can do so together. grab them all in one hand... drip them for 10 seconds.

  2. #22
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    Instructions for Beseler tubes

    Quote Originally Posted by clothesontheline View Post

    Also, what are developing tubes and rotary agitators?

    -Thanks!
    Here is a link to the instruction sheet for the Beseler version of the tubes. They were designed for either colour or black and white paper. You load the paper into the tube under safelight, and then go through the development process in room light.

    The rotary agitators are motors that rotate the tubes for you (to ensure the chemicals are evenly spread over the paper, and don't exhaust). The link shows how you can do this as well by hand: http://mikecnichols.com/beseler/Bese...uctions%5D.pdf
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by clothesontheline View Post
    Few Answers/Questions:

    1) I Plan on using homemade pinhole cameras, partly constructed by the kids but supervised for excellence. I also will be using large oatmeal boxes and/or other large containers to print on 5x7 paper photo prints.
    How are you making the holes? You need to know how large the pinholes are (and how far they are from the paper) in order to determine the exposure time.

    Quote Originally Posted by clothesontheline View Post
    2) What do you mean by "Arista" papers? Are they still great quality, or is there a noticeable difference between those and Ilford multigrades?
    Arista paper. It's different to Ilford but excellent quality; people do exhibitions on this paper and I have a few 16x20" prints on my walls made from it. The low pricing is a function of how it's imported in bulk and resold mostly unbranded.

    See also Kentmere: 25 sheets, 100 sheets. It costs between Arista and Ilford, is made by Ilford, and is much more sensitive, which makes it better for pinhole work.

    And Direct Positive paper. More expensive than normal Ilford paper, but the contrast should be better, and you don't need to use a separate sheet for both the pinhole exposure and the print. However, it's fibre-based paper which is much more difficult to process - you need additional chemicals and very long washing times.

  4. #24
    Bill Burk's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by polyglot View Post
    And Direct Positive paper. More expensive than normal Ilford paper, but the contrast should be better, and you don't need to use a separate sheet for both the pinhole exposure and the print. However, it's fibre-based paper which is much more difficult to process - you need additional chemicals and very long washing times.
    Oh yes that is a great idea for this project! Red safelight should be real easy to find. One sheet needed per student instead of two! Or you could let them try twice.

  5. #25
    clothesontheline's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by polyglot View Post
    How are you making the holes? You need to know how large the pinholes are (and how far they are from the paper) in order to determine the exposure time.
    Thats just the thing, I'm not exactly sure. I plan on using oatmeal boxes or other circular containers, maybe a paint can or two, etc. I already have 2 sites instructing on how to do it exactly: http://users.rcn.com/stewoody/makecam.htm and http://www.alternativephotography.co...aking-a-camera ... seem like good sources? other ideas? For the pinhole they all all suggest fine/very fine sewing needles (first mentioned #16, #15, and #14, so I'll see what I can do. Would my best bet be to test each one out individually beforehand and record the exposure times to get the right measurements? Can I cut the photo paper in strips for the tests so I dont waste paper?

    Quote Originally Posted by polyglot View Post
    And Direct Positive paper. More expensive than normal Ilford paper, but the contrast should be better, and you don't need to use a separate sheet for both the pinhole exposure and the print. However, it's fibre-based paper which is much more difficult to process - you need additional chemicals and very long washing times.
    I'm not exactly convinced that direct positives will save me time or money... For starters, direct positives are going to require me to make an individual photo for each person, since I cant make copies of them. Plus that means that there will be around 25 different exposures, and there's no telling if 1/2 of them will turn out right the first time. Plus, at this point were only going to make probably around 5 pinhole cameras, so it would be difficult to keep going back and forth between kids using the same cameras, plus the photo paper is more expensive so I wouldn't have as much room for failure. Additionally, time and money are of the essence so additional chemicals and processing times would be a burden. Please let me know if these arguments are valid or flat. I'm not a pro at this type of thing, at least not yet.

  6. #26
    clothesontheline's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Burk View Post
    The extra time will help! Will 5 kids work one day/ 5 the next? Or is it more like Photo Day Wednesday and camp's out Friday?
    More like Photo Day Wednesday..

  7. #27
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    This ? is for anyone willing to answer: What is the difference between RC Graded Paper and RC Variable Contrast Paper..............Additionally, what do the different grades in graded paper mean?

  8. #28
    Bill Burk's Avatar
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    Grade is the contrast between black and white, think like the grade of a hill. Steep is contrasty (5) Gentle slope is flat (1). Grade 2 or 3 is normal. With variable contrast you can use purple (5) to yellow (1) filters to get any number in-between.

    Probably won't matter to you because you just want to get results. The grades are usually used to refine the look.

    A respected subscriber here, Ralph Lambrecht wrote a book which we all love called "Way Beyond Monochrome" - On his website www.waybeyondmonochrome.com he has sample chapters, including one for how to poke a pinhole. Basically start with a ballpoint pen to dent... then follow-up with a pin to make the hole.

  9. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by clothesontheline View Post
    This ? is for anyone willing to answer: What is the difference between RC Graded Paper and RC Variable Contrast Paper..............Additionally, what do the different grades in graded paper mean?
    VC paper has multiple emulsion layers of different contrast. The high contrast layers are sensitive to bluer light, the low contrast layers are sensitive to green light. When making a print, you use a coloured filter to control the light colour and therefore the contrast of your final print. Because the paper produces varying contrast with exposure colour, you will find that blue items in your scene are rendered with high contrast and green items are rendered with low contrast. Red items will be black because paper is insensitive to red.

    Graded paper has a single layer of fixed contrast. However it's often only blue-sensitive, which means that both red and green items in the scene will be black, which makes it difficult to get a good image.

    You might consider buying a small quantity of green-sensitive X-ray film. It's extremely cheap - see links on LFPF for sources. That would get you more latitude, far better exposure speed (10x), no weird colour/contrast variation and you can process it under safelight. If you use (for example) Ilford PQ Universal developer, it can develop both the film and the paper.

    Definitely you can/should test your exposures with strips (or small tiles) of paper. Hence the term "test strip".

  10. #30
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    So, basically RC graded paper is just a way to know the contrast(with 2-3 being the normal levels), but what is variable contrast paper and why is it different between lets say a 2 or a 3

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