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  1. #11
    heterolysis's Avatar
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    Reducing the concentration to half may not translate to simply doubling the fixing time. Chemistry can be funny like that.

    The shelf life of fixer is quite good, and it's really easy to check. If you're really having troubles with your fix getting old, don't mix up the whole batch next time.

  2. #12
    MattKing's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by heterolysis View Post
    Reducing the concentration to half may not translate to simply doubling the fixing time. Chemistry can be funny like that.

    The shelf life of fixer is quite good, and it's really easy to check. If you're really having troubles with your fix getting old, don't mix up the whole batch next time.
    I really wouldn't recommend mixing up only a portion of a bag of powdered fixer.

    If you are going to try to vary your process from the manufacturer's recommendations, you will need to add additional test procedures to confirm that your materials are adequately fixed. Otherwise, over time, your results may degrade.

    The costs and inconvenience of the additional tests will most likely exceed the benefit of the more dilute fix.

    If however you are already performing those tests (to confirm proper fixation and washing) then I would say: experiment to your heart's content.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  3. #13
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    I would like to think Kodak know what they are talking about and probably have more collective experience than your friend. I can understand wanting to do it differently if it doesn't work, but as the saying goes "if it isn’t broken don't fix it".

    “The contemplation of things as they are, without error or confusion, without substitution or imposture, is in itself a nobler thing than a whole harvest of invention”

    Francis Bacon

  4. #14
    Sirius Glass's Avatar
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    You could save more money if you just skipped using fixer. Then you will really get what you are paying for.
    Warning!! Handling a Hasselblad can be harmful to your financial well being!

    Nothing beats a great piece of glass!

    I leave the digital work for the urologists and proctologists.

  5. #15
    heterolysis's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MattKing View Post
    I really wouldn't recommend mixing up only a portion of a bag of powdered fixer.
    I don't necessarily think it's a great idea either, but if the powder is thoroughly mixed beforehand and carefully measured, it should be okay. I would think the margin of error would be less than diluting the fix and assuming it has linear properties, but I certainly wouldn't mix of portions of something more critical such as developer.

  6. #16
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    I'm assuming you'll get a bunch of "skimping on chemistry is false economy" responses, so let me be the first to agree with them

    You are best off following Kodak's instructions to the letter.
    When one wants to try something new or unconventional, experts should be consulted beforehand. They will tell you that it can't possibly work and why. Then go and do it anyway ...

    Or so the saying goes.

    Dan, I don't suggest you dilute the fixer at will and suffer from stained negatives a few years down the road. What I do suggest is that you equip yourself with a retained Silver kit and see whether diluted fixer achieves archival fixing with the method you and your friend suggest. These kits are moderately cheap and easy to get, the last for a month or more and should give you plenty of opportunity to test your hypothesis. Either you find a way to make diluted fixer work for you (and save some money down the road), or you discover that after all is said and done, Kodak's instructions are the most efficient and economical way to fix your film.
    Last edited by Rudeofus; 05-23-2013 at 08:48 AM. Click to view previous post history.
    Trying to be the best of whatever I am, even if what I am is no good.

  7. #17
    ic-racer's Avatar
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    Try it and see. Let us know. http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/produc...lver_Test.html
    Personally I use all my Fixer for film as one-shot and don't re-use any of it.

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