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  1. #1

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    Questions about split fixing and hardener

    I recently switched to split/2-bath fixing for my film development so I can stretch each batch as long as I can.
    Two questions:
    Will having the hardener in the first fix prevent the second fix from being effective?
    If so, and I use a separate hardener bath, should I wash before hardening (to clear as much fix as possible)?

    Oh, I guess three questions: am I crazy? :P
    The camera is the most incidental element of photography.

  2. #2

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    hi okto

    modern films don't really require hardener. it makes it harder ( pardon the pun ) to wash the emulsion free of chemistry.
    i only started to use hardener in my fix, after 31 years, this year, because i am using liquid emulsion on glass,
    and it frills ( puckers, lifts and may peel off / tear ) if you don't use a hardening fixer.
    i still never use it for film or paper ... and don't plan on every using it on anything but coated glass plates.
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  3. #3

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    I've only heard this hardener-makes-washing-difficult argument on paper, not film. Even then, photographers have been using Kodak Professional Fixer (the powder kind) that contains hardener for decades.

    I do know, if you intend to tone, hardener impacts toner's ability to change color.

    Also, when you use 2-bath method, length of fixing total is not any longer than one bath method. I wouldn't think it'll make that much difference. I guess a better question will be, do you use a kind of film that require hardening treatment? Most modern emulsions are hard enough that something like that isn't even necessary.
    Develop, stop, fix.... wait.... where's my film?

  4. #4
    Mainecoonmaniac's Avatar
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    The rule I use for fixing film is double the time for it to clear. For example, if it takes 2 minutes for your film to clear, total fix time is 4 minutes. Do any other APUGers use that rule?
    "Photography, like surfing, is an infinite process, a constantly evolving exploration of life."
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  5. #5
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    You need to wash films longer if a hardening fixer's been used than unhardened.

    Ilford state that using hardener is no longr recommended except for some exceptional circumstances, processing over 30°C, using roller transport machines, when fast drying is needed (usually higher heat) ect.

    Ian

  6. #6
    Rick A's Avatar
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    Trying to save fixer is a bit of false economy. Switch to a non-hardening fix and save water.
    Rick A
    Argentum aevum

  7. #7
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rick A View Post
    Trying to save fixer is a bit of false economy. Switch to a non-hardening fix and save water.
    With 2 bath fixing you get better economy, more effective fixing but in reality the only true benefits are with fibre based papers.

    Ian



 

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