Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 73,575   Posts: 1,621,943   Online: 1075
      
Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 21 to 30 of 32
  1. #21
    cliveh's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Shooter
    35mm RF
    Posts
    3,928
    Images
    344
    A scan of your negatives may give us better information to help answer your original question.

    “The contemplation of things as they are, without error or confusion, without substitution or imposture, is in itself a nobler thing than a whole harvest of invention”

    Francis Bacon

  2. #22
    Truzi's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,398
    Sorry, I don't have a scanner at the moment, so I can't give examples. I think I'm going to jot down some of the information in the posts here for my own experimenting.
    Truzi

  3. #23

    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Busan, Korea
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    2
    I'm very much a noob to film photography and black and white.

    I have been using a UV or Skylight filter (which is UV with a pink tint, right?) anytime I'm shooting outdoors under sunlight. I was told it cuts down on "haze".

    Anyone more experienced want to weigh in on the need for UV protection?

  4. #24
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Minnesota
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    14,720
    Images
    291
    Quote Originally Posted by fostergregd View Post
    I'm very much a noob to film photography and black and white.

    I have been using a UV or Skylight filter (which is UV with a pink tint, right?) anytime I'm shooting outdoors under sunlight. I was told it cuts down on "haze".

    Anyone more experienced want to weigh in on the need for UV protection?
    The only way you're going to be satisfied is to take the filter off once in a while and see for yourself. I doubt it will make much difference, especially with black and white film.

    A UV filter may be handy especially when you use older lenses. But your best friend is always going to be a good quality lens hood to shade your lens from direct sunlight. Your lens works best when it looks at reflected light.
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

  5. #25
    Chris Lange's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    NY
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    775
    Images
    33
    When I use my Nikon F3 on the street, I almost always use Tri-X or HP5+, almost always with a 35/1.4 Ai-S, and almost always use a deep red25 filter. I almost always push it, too. Not a big fan of midtones when I'm using that setup...

    Conversely, when I use my Leica, I use a Summicron DR, and the same films, but rarely use a filter, and err on the side of over exposure for smoothness.

    Diff'rint strokez.
    See my work at my website CHRISTOPHER LANGE PHOTOGRAPHY

    or my snaps at my blog MINIMUM DENSITY
    --
    If you don't have it, then you don't have it.

  6. #26
    MattKing's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Delta, British Columbia, Canada
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    13,368
    Images
    60
    Quote Originally Posted by fostergregd View Post
    I'm very much a noob to film photography and black and white.

    I have been using a UV or Skylight filter (which is UV with a pink tint, right?) anytime I'm shooting outdoors under sunlight. I was told it cuts down on "haze".

    Anyone more experienced want to weigh in on the need for UV protection?
    A skylight is a weak UV filter.

    A UV filter cuts down the amount of UV light that reaches the film. You cannot see UV light, but films do - some films more than others.

    UV light tends to bounce around amongst the dust particles in our atmosphere (aka haze) so film sees more of the haze than our eyes do. A UV filter reduces that effect.

    Try shots with and without the filter, on hazy days and days where the air is cleaner (like after a rain storm). You may very well see clear differences.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  7. #27
    donkee's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Mid Michigan USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    147
    Quote Originally Posted by MattKing View Post
    Try shots with and without the filter, on hazy days and days where the air is cleaner (like after a rain storm). You may very well see clear differences.
    That is the best way, try them all and see what you get. Only then will you know.

  8. #28

    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    San Francisco Bay Area
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    882
    Images
    45
    For monochrome, a colour filter works to lighten matching parts of the subject and darkens other colours. You can preview the effect by flipping the filter in front of your eye and away. You should not need a filter to get a grey tone from blue sky unless you are underexposing or possibly over developing, or using Ortho film, for example.

    With the exception of UV or Skylight 'clear lens caps', I put on a filter because I need the effect. Which means I have to change the way the film will render the scene to get the effect I want. i do a lot of landscape work, so I probably use yellow-green or green more than anything else to adjust the separation of foliage.
    I feel, therefore I photograph.

  9. #29
    cliveh's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Shooter
    35mm RF
    Posts
    3,928
    Images
    344
    Quote Originally Posted by MattKing View Post
    A skylight is a weak UV filter.
    I always thought they were the same thing.

    “The contemplation of things as they are, without error or confusion, without substitution or imposture, is in itself a nobler thing than a whole harvest of invention”

    Francis Bacon

  10. #30
    NedL's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Sonoma County, California
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,199
    Images
    20
    And just my very simple 2 cents: that haze on distant objects can be a good thing too, depending on what you want.

Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin