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  1. #11

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    It's the acid used in the bleach that causes the gelatin to denaturate. The permanganate doesn't counteract that while the dichromate does.
    Having said that, you have several options:
    1) use the permanganate at 18°C;
    2) use a glutaraldehyde hardener in the first developer and a permanganate bleach;
    3) use dichromate;

    For the fogging step: you can use a dithionite fogging redeveloper. I'm working on it. There's this household chem "Super Iron Out". I'm told it will work but as of today I still haven't found the right concentration. 15g/l seems too little, fog is uneven and it yields muddy gray instead of solid black.
    Stannous chloride must be used in an acidic buffer (acetic acid/acetate) otherwise it won't work.

  2. #12
    dr5chrome's Avatar
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    B&W slide

    www.dr5.com



    Quote Originally Posted by destroya View Post
    its time to order more film. ive never shot plus-x before and wanted to try it. i read that a lot of people who have used the orwo UN 54 film say it very similar. on their web site they state that it can also be processed as a reversal film. I love color slides and have never shot B&W slides, so i thought i would do a little digging.

    but when i search for reversal chems i cant seem to find any (pre-made) except for a photo formula designed for tmax. so i have had a hard time finding a recipe to make my own. i'm sure if i had a copy of the darkroom cookbook it would be in there. i was hoping to find something that could be done as it would be cool to have a film that could be developed both ways.

    any ideas?

    thanks
    john

  3. #13
    dr5chrome's Avatar
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    PLUS-X

    PLUS-x 35mm is a great film for B&W-sildes. http://www.dr5.com/blackandwhiteslide/px.html

    FYI



    Quote Originally Posted by johnielvis View Post
    don't try to reverse plus-x--you'll be disappointed unless you have very special circumstances you must photograph. It does have an extremely high dynamic range, but it looks flat for normal scenes.

    there are many many threads on reversal going on. look at the one on "brown stain"--a dude just gave his recipe for reversing fp4. Note that this formula uses hypo in the developer which is something that I avoid, since it reduces quality at the expense of shorter processing times and increased apparent film speed. The best way to start us using a very very strong high contrast developer--d-19 is the go-to recommendation in this case. For bleach, the best, by far, is a dichromate (potassium, ammonium, sodium, whateverum)--these solutions are very stable whereas the permanganate bleaches erode while you're mixing them. Note that permanganate is every bit as dangerous as dichromate, so don't be afraid of it. Just take proper precautions, educate yourself on how to handle chemicals, and you'll be just fine.

  4. #14
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    If you look carefully on teh Kodak Motion picture film site, there are the formulas for Plus-X _REVERSAL_ and Tri-X _REVERSAL_ which were and are respectively only sold in 16mm. Those formulas are what Movie labs use successfully to reverse ORWO UN54.

    http://motion.kodak.com/motion/uploa...2415_h2415.pdf

    The Kodak Movie formulas Don't work reliably with Foma R-100. The Kodak process is more environmentally friendly, and so less effective at bleaching.
    Charles MacDonald
    aa508@ncf.ca
    I still live just beyond the fringe in Stittsville

  5. #15
    cmacd123's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by johnielvis View Post
    so plus x reversal is the same as plus x--I didn't know that.
    NO it is (was) not. Plus X reversal , Plus x negative and Plus x still film are supposed to be all different, although obviously related.
    Charles MacDonald
    aa508@ncf.ca
    I still live just beyond the fringe in Stittsville

  6. #16
    dr5chrome's Avatar
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    ..sorry, not correct. These emulsions are the same.



    Quote Originally Posted by cmacd123 View Post
    NO it is (was) not. Plus X reversal , Plus x negative and Plus x still film are supposed to be all different, although obviously related.

  7. #17
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    I don't know about the reversal emulsion but the cine (5231) and still are pragmatically the same.
    Stop worrying about grain, resolution, sharpness, and everything else that doesn't have a damn thing to do with substance.

    http://www.flickr.com/kediwah

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