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  1. #1
    destroya's Avatar
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    B&W reversal chems

    its time to order more film. ive never shot plus-x before and wanted to try it. i read that a lot of people who have used the orwo UN 54 film say it very similar. on their web site they state that it can also be processed as a reversal film. I love color slides and have never shot B&W slides, so i thought i would do a little digging.

    but when i search for reversal chems i cant seem to find any (pre-made) except for a photo formula designed for tmax. so i have had a hard time finding a recipe to make my own. i'm sure if i had a copy of the darkroom cookbook it would be in there. i was hoping to find something that could be done as it would be cool to have a film that could be developed both ways.

    any ideas?

    thanks
    john

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    Foma do a reversal kit, at least they do over here, and they also do a reversal black ands white film

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    Foma do a kit which one of the larger US photo distributors may carry.

    Otherwise it's not too hard to find a "how to" online. googling for "B&W reversal development" got me all the results I needed to get started.

    Ilford's site carries a PDF about reversal, and though it specifically names their own developers in it, I followed it to the letter just the other night, changing only the developers for what I had to hand and got excellent results (for a first try) using Lucky film.

  4. #4
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    Here from another thread is a method and the chemical formulation.
    Cheers - Andy C
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    16mm Cine, 35mm, 120, 5x4 & 7x5.

  5. #5
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    i have been playing around with reversing pan-f using ilford bromophen and a permanganate/sodium bisulfate (pH decreaser from pool stores). i once tried reversing pan-f and upon re-exposure under an enlarger following the clearing bath the emulsion kind of slid off the base and floated nonchalantly in the tray of water i had the film in. johnielvis, is this a product of the unstable permanganate bleach i was using or that i was using a paper developer instead of a high-contrast film developer, which d-19 is?

    as for the OP, my junior experiments indicate that you can only go so far with the 'right' recipe for a given film - you simply have to experiment, experiment and experiment some more. as a starting point the guy in this thread from some time ago http://www.apug.org/forums/forum228/...process-4.html is getting some good results based on scans of his film.

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by destroya View Post
    its time to order more film. ive never shot plus-x before and wanted to try it. i read that a lot of people who have used the orwo UN 54 film say it very similar. on their web site they state that it can also be processed as a reversal film. I love color slides and have never shot B&W slides, so i thought i would do a little digging.

    but when i search for reversal chems i cant seem to find any (pre-made) except for a photo formula designed for tmax. so i have had a hard time finding a recipe to make my own. i'm sure if i had a copy of the darkroom cookbook it would be in there. i was hoping to find something that could be done as it would be cool to have a film that could be developed both ways.

    any ideas?

    thanks
    john
    If you are thinking about a kit and decide to use the Foma, then probably the best thing to start with is Foma's own R100 reversal film. I've never used both together but I presume the kit and the film are made for each other. Otherwise you will need to experiment. For some people the experimental approach becomes a long journey with a delayed arrival. Others (apparently) hit it right very quickly. Steve Roberts (in johnielevis' thread link) has a process that successfully works with the film he used (FP4). That must be a good place to start if you do go the long way.

    Potassium Permanganate vs. Dichromate isn't much of an issue at this stage in your quest, imo. People have used both with success.
    Last edited by mr.datsun; 05-29-2013 at 09:03 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  7. #7

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    Read the following article from Ilford. It will answer your questions http://www.ilfordphoto.com/applications/page.asp?n=90
    A rock pile ceases to be a rock pile the moment a single man contemplates it, bearing within him the image of a cathedral.

    ~Antoine de Saint-Exupery

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    Chemical exposure with SnCl2 (Stannous Chloride / Tin(II) Chloride) is easy to do either with second developer or as a separate bath.See Jens Osbahr's pdf at: http://home.snafu.de/jens.osbahr/pho...r_reversal.pdf

    This takes care of emulsion peel off problems as well as repeatability issues of re-exposure but somehow most people tend to lean towards light exposure. Try it if you can get hands on SnCl2.

  9. #9

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    Having processed many rolls of Ektachrome using a fogging exposure I have never experienced any problems. No emulsion separation, no repeatability problems, no problems at all.

    For B&W slides the use of a a fogging developer such as sodium sulfide or thiocarbamide obviates the need for re-exposure. Slides made this way have a pleasant old-time sepia look.
    A rock pile ceases to be a rock pile the moment a single man contemplates it, bearing within him the image of a cathedral.

    ~Antoine de Saint-Exupery

  10. #10
    destroya's Avatar
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    found this thread and it makes me think that i could pull it off. i especially like the "iron off" idea which is the 2nd developer that performs fogging, developing and fix, all in one.

    anyone tried something similar?

    http://www.flickr.com/groups/1924424...7629499928508/

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