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  1. #11

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    I don't want lower contrast, though. And like I said, I don't mind some grain, just so long as it isn't over the top. I know some people like fine grained films, but if it were my thing, I'd probably shoot Delta or Tmax instead. Besides, I have a near full bottle of DD-X that I'd rather not waste .

    If agitation is the problem, then how often should I do? 4x in 10 seconds every minute like I was doing at the very beginning?
    cities & citizens - edmonton street photography (mostly), 100% film

  2. #12

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    why not 2 x 30 sec?

  3. #13

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    Ok, I can try that tonight and report back. Thanks. I'll check back in about 1/2 hr in case anyone else has any suggestions, but otherwise, I'll try that.
    cities & citizens - edmonton street photography (mostly), 100% film

  4. #14

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    Keep reading--lots of smart people here, smarter than me. All I know is I saw unwven developmet in both your pictures, and agitation is the first obvious culprit, especially with short development times.

  5. #15
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    This is a tough one. I can't offer much advice on how to solve it, but if I were you, I would shoot a throwaway roll or two and cut it up in 2 or 3 pieces to develop one at a time. Trying to solve the problem by working on photos you want to keep only adds to the frustration and anxiety. Leave your keepers undeveloped until you solve this.

    Oddly enough, my nemesis is digital. I have been trying to scan colour negs and print them for several years now, with only marginal success. I can hear your frustration.

  6. #16
    MattKing's Avatar
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    I too see uneven development.

    A couple of suggestions:

    1) try pre-soaking the film in water for two minutes prior to development. Make sure that the water is the same temperature as your mixed developer; and
    2) start your development with 30 seconds of continuous, gentle, rotating, randomized agitation. After that, you can transition to two gentle, rotating, randomized agitation cycles in 5 seconds each 30 seconds.

    Adjust your times if the contrast isn't to taste.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  7. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by MattKing View Post
    I too see uneven development.

    A couple of suggestions:

    1) try pre-soaking the film in water for two minutes prior to development. Make sure that the water is the same temperature as your mixed developer; and
    2) start your development with 30 seconds of continuous, gentle, rotating, randomized agitation. After that, you can transition to two gentle, rotating, randomized agitation cycles in 5 seconds each 30 seconds.

    Adjust your times if the contrast isn't to taste.
    Perfect answer.

  8. #18

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    Alright, I just processed 2 rolls using of HP5 that I put through my Konica Hexar using Tom's suggestion. I'll scan them tomorrow after they've dried and see if the issue is resolved or at least mitigated somewhat. Matt, can always count on you for great suggestions. Thanks again for the advice. I'll try that out too even if Tom's suggestion works, just to be sure. I have two FP4 rolls needing to be processed, anyway. Just a couple questions for clarification: rotating how? The normal inversion agitation or something like holding it upright and turning it in clockwise and counterclockwise motions? Something else? If the contrast isn't up to par, adjust my times in what direction? More agitation or less?
    cities & citizens - edmonton street photography (mostly), 100% film

  9. #19

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    Which way you turn doesn't mean anything. If you want more contrast, develop longer. Be sure your exposure meter is accurate before moving on to underexposure and overdevelopment experiments to gain contrast. Also, watch your enlarger bulb for ageing to avoid going too yellow on VC paper. But ignore all this for now. Just listen to Matt King for now. You're probably all fixed up already.

  10. #20
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    Most spots/blobs are uneven development and/or drying. A good pre-wash will help the development issue, and a good pre-dry squeegee can help reduce water spots. I find 35mm is especially problematic when drying. When I started doing colour processing, in which a pre-wash is a necessary step, I really started to notice the difference it can make.

    Careful how you handle the film when loading it onto reels, and what it comes in contact with in the process, so as to reduce finger prints/dust. However, I find dust on the scanner is generally a bigger problem than on the film itself.

    I agitate for the first 30, then once a minute. If you're not using a stock developer solution, make sure the working solution is mixed well or else the concentrate may be mostly sitting at the bottom of your graduated cylinder when you start to pour.

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