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  1. #1

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    Pyrocat HD stand develop in tank

    What film (medium format) is better to use for stand development in tank by Pyrocat HD ?

    How do you do that?

    What do you think about it?

    Regards

  2. #2

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    In my opinion staining developers like Pyrocat are a poor choice for stand development. Due to the very low level of preservative (sodium sulfite) present in the highly dilute developer it is very sensitive to aerial oxidation. This can lead to reduced activity, dichroic fog, mottling and unpredictable results. The only recommended technique approaching stand development is for intermittent agitation.
    Last edited by Gerald C Koch; 05-30-2013 at 11:01 AM. Click to view previous post history.
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  3. #3
    Eric Rose's Avatar
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    Stand works, but semi stand is better. I've used semi stand on traditional silver rich emulsions and the newer Delta/TMAX films and both work well.
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  4. #4

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    In addition there is the criticism of stand development per se. This technique is designed to reduce the contrast of a high contrast subject. It was never intended as a general purpose technique. Books on the Zone System describe its correct use. Its use with normally lighted scenes will result in a low contrast image.
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  5. #5

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    To answer the question in the OP, the article on Pyrocat-HD in unblinkingeye mentions the problem of dichroic fog with some fast films.
    Last edited by Gerald C Koch; 05-30-2013 at 11:26 AM. Click to view previous post history.
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  6. #6
    Klainmeister's Avatar
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    If you do semi-stand, it works fine. Longest I have developed for was 22 minutes without any sort of issues. The film printed as expected.

    A lot of films work great with PCat, and I can recommend Fuji Acros as a personal favorite and always a great performer in general, regardless of developer.
    K.S. Klain

  7. #7

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    Funny u should mention acros cuz that was the one film i have had problems with...i assume semi stand in a tank!!!

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  8. #8
    Steve Sherman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gerald C Koch View Post
    In addition there is the criticism of stand development per se. This technique is designed to reduce the contrast of a high contrast subject. It was never intended as a general purpose technique. Books on the Zone System describe its correct use. Its use with normally lighted scenes will result in a low contrast image.
    As with so many topics on these forums, many posters are correct, but their experiences with a given topic are incomplete.

    While the above statement is true, it is incomplete. I can attest that the lowest of contrast situations can be expanded due to edge contrast enhancement. And so in a nutshell you now have why the process has become my only form of film development since I discovered it's possibilities 9 years ago, has nothing to due with sharpness and everything to do with the creative possibilities the process affords a photographer with an imagination.

    Very simply, in the hands of someone who knows the extraordinary possibilities of this process, I'll make this bold statement. Film speed is maximized, at box speed or higher, the process inherently compresses contrast and with proper dilution / agitation technique the impression of edge contrast is so exaggerated as to swell contrast from a literal scene of 3 zones to a full black to white AZO chloride print.

    I can make these statements because I have the prints to back up these bold statements and the years of trial an error in perfecting the process. THerefore, and apologies to those who have serious interest, I have little time to debate, I have and will engage in meaningful dialogue with those who understand the entire process and it's possibilities. Unfortunately, there are those on the forums, (none present in this thread) that will dispute just about anything for reasons I don't understand, therefore many times they win out due to the louder voice. SAD!
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  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gerald C Koch View Post
    In addition there is the criticism of stand development per se. This technique is designed to reduce the contrast of a high contrast subject. It was never intended as a general purpose technique. Books on the Zone System describe its correct use. Its use with normally lighted scenes will result in a low contrast image.
    Although - in testing this process I have found there is often less contrast reduction than one might expect.

    There is also the matter of "stand" vs "semi-stand" etc.

    I agree one should always be aware of the potential risks involved with this type of process.

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by Pasukaru View Post
    What film (medium format) is better to use for stand development in tank by Pyrocat HD ?

    How do you do that?

    What do you think about it?

    Regards
    Pasakaru: Gerald's points regarding the risks are very important so take them seriously. Stand development may require some experimentation on your part so I suggest some practice and refinement before using it in the field. With Pyrocat HD specifically, probably best to start by reading what Sandy King has to say on unblinkingeye.com and following his suggestions for stand, semi-stand, reduced agitation with this developer.

    Generally speaking when it comes to stand development, a pre-soak before development seems to be preferable. The after-development processes shouldn't require anything special. Another general recommendation, as Gerald pointed out, is to stick with slow to medium speed films (say ISO 100 or less).

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