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  1. #11
    Hexavalent's Avatar
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    Tabular grains can also be core-shell. There are patents that describe the combination of crystal technologies.

    IIRC, "T-Grain" is a Kodak trademark - other manufacturers use different names: 'Tabular' is the generic term.
    - Ian

  2. #12

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    TMax and Delta films are tabular grain films.

    Tabular grain developer? Well, some people claim it is better to use developers with less solvent action. One could also make the argument they don't particularly require "fine grain" development sinve they are inherently more fine grained than more traditional films. On the other hand, neither Kodak or Ilford recommend anything more special than D-76/ID-11, or XTOL (in Kodak's case), to get the maximum quality out of their respective tabular grain films. I'd tend to go with what they say.

  3. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gerald C Koch View Post
    Not according to information on the web...
    Ah, yes, the Internet. Not the most unimpeachable source.

    Here's what HARMAN has to say about the subject:

    Last edited by Sal Santamaura; 06-02-2013 at 12:05 PM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: Added link.

  4. #14
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    And conversely, you can certainly use developers marketed for new tech films with old tech films. I use T-Max RS regularly for other films, because it's convenient, I've been using it for years and it works well.

    There's absolutely nothing special about some developers that make them work better with old tech or new tech films except, as mentioned above, that newer films tend to be finer grained so relatively grainier developers can be used for their other benefits if desired without excess graininess.

  5. #15
    Roger Cole's Avatar
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    I have also found that I don't care for T-Max films in Diafine where I like it a lot with most older films. I could conjecture about why but would no doubt be wrong, and told so. However it does "work" it just doesn't get the effective speed I see with older films. It can still be useful for compensation.

  6. #16

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    An example of a developer specifically designed for tabular grain films would be Crawley's FX-37.
    Last edited by Gerald C Koch; 06-02-2013 at 12:28 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    A rock pile ceases to be a rock pile the moment a single man contemplates it, bearing within him the image of a cathedral.

    ~Antoine de Saint-Exupery

  7. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sal Santamaura View Post
    Here's what HARMAN has to say about the subject:
    Of course both Harmon and Ilford have a dog in the fight and patents to defend. They would be touchy about terminology. Still no matter what the technology is called it is usually all lumped under the term tabular grain.

    Xerox Corporation for many years tried to stop the use of xerox as a verb. This was an attempt to defend their trade name. They failed and people are free to say "I xeroxed that document" without fear of lawsuit.
    Last edited by Gerald C Koch; 06-02-2013 at 12:37 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    A rock pile ceases to be a rock pile the moment a single man contemplates it, bearing within him the image of a cathedral.

    ~Antoine de Saint-Exupery

  8. #18
    Richard Sintchak (rich815)'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gerald C Koch View Post
    Not according to information on the web.

    "Tabular-grain film is a type of photographic film that includes nearly all color films, T-MAX films from Kodak (with Kodak's T-grain emulsion), Delta films from Ilford Photo and the Fujifilm Neopan films. The silver halide crystals in the film emulsion are flatter and more tabular (hence T-Grain)."

    Unfortunately things are not usually named by scientists or engineers but by marketing weasels.
    I thought only the Neopan Acros was tabular type and supposedly a "hybrid" at that, or so I've read. I'm pretty sure the Neopan 400, Neopan 1600 and certainly the Neopan 100SS are not. But who knows if any, even the Neopan 400, is even made anymore....I guess Acros is.
    -----------------------

    "Well, my photos are actually much better than they look..."

    Richard S.
    Albany, CA (San Francisco bay area)

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