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  1. #1

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    Ilford Delta in HC110

    Has anybody ever developed Delta 100 in HC110?

    I ran a few rolls of it through my RZ and forgot I didn't have any DD-X left. It's always been my developer for the Delta films, but I figured I'd give it a shot in HC-110 since I have loads of it laying around.

    I developed in dilution H and since no times were published for that dilution I guessed at 9 minutes and went for it. All I can say is WOW! Delta 100 & HC100 gives some great SHARP negatives. I'd say easily on par with T-grain developers. Definitely going to be my new combo from now on.

    I'm going to shoot a few sheets of Delta in 5x7 and try it in a tray to see if I can replicate the results.
    Last edited by Shootar401; 06-01-2013 at 08:39 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  2. #2

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    I looked for published times and only found dilution B & E. All the different variations really turn me off from experimenting. I like knowing why something works when I use it.

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  4. #4

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    Look here http://www.covingtoninnovations.com/hc110/ Lots of useful information on HC-110.
    A rock pile ceases to be a rock pile the moment a single man contemplates it, bearing within him the image of a cathedral.

    ~Antoine de Saint-Exupery

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by Shootar401 View Post
    ...on par with T-grain developers...
    What's a "T-grain developer?"

  6. #6

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    A T-grain developer is one that is specifically formulated to work with T-grain emulsions such as Ilford Delta and Kodak Tmax.
    A rock pile ceases to be a rock pile the moment a single man contemplates it, bearing within him the image of a cathedral.

    ~Antoine de Saint-Exupery

  7. #7
    kintatsu's Avatar
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    I've found it to be a great combination. I developed my shots in a tray for 9 minutes in Dilution E, and got beautiful results. The one big thing I noticed about this combination is that it's really sensitive to changes in agitation and time. Smaller changes seem to be needed to expand your range, at least so far this has been my experience.

  8. #8
    David Brown's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rwreich View Post
    I looked for published times and only found dilution B & E. All the different variations really turn me off from experimenting. I like knowing why something works when I use it.
    Then use Dilution B.

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gerald C Koch View Post
    A T-grain developer is one that is specifically formulated to work with T-grain emulsions such as Ilford Delta and Kodak Tmax.
    Delta emulsions are core-shell technology, not T-grain. Kodak uses T grains.

    That aside, referring to developers in a way that implies they're "for" these specific emulsion types, and conversely implying they're "not for" cubic grain emulsions, is neither standard practice nor wise. Any black and white film developer can be used with any black and white negative film. Results from various combinations thereof range from very bad to excellent, irrespective of what the developer is called or was allegedly intended for. Trying them out is the only way to determine suitability of negatives for a given purpose/taste.

    Kodak screwed up when naming its TMAX and TMAX-RS developers. As a result, people have been confused ever since.

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sal Santamaura View Post
    Delta emulsions are core-shell technology, not T-grain. Kodak uses T grains.

    That aside, referring to developers in a way that implies they're "for" these specific emulsion types, and conversely implying they're "not for" cubic grain emulsions, is neither standard practice nor wise.
    Not according to information on the web.

    "Tabular-grain film is a type of photographic film that includes nearly all color films, T-MAX films from Kodak (with Kodak's T-grain emulsion), Delta films from Ilford Photo and the Fujifilm Neopan films. The silver halide crystals in the film emulsion are flatter and more tabular (hence T-Grain)."

    Unfortunately things are not usually named by scientists or engineers but by marketing weasels.
    Last edited by Gerald C Koch; 06-02-2013 at 10:21 AM. Click to view previous post history.
    A rock pile ceases to be a rock pile the moment a single man contemplates it, bearing within him the image of a cathedral.

    ~Antoine de Saint-Exupery

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