Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 76,254   Posts: 1,680,477   Online: 685
      
Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 21 to 30 of 34
  1. #21

    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Southern USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,895
    Quote Originally Posted by Sirius Glass View Post
    Just because a car or truck can be driven into a river until the engine is flooded, does not mean that driving a car or truck into a river is the best use of the car or truck.
    Too many people seem to confuse the verbs can and should.
    A rock pile ceases to be a rock pile the moment a single man contemplates it, bearing within him the image of a cathedral.

    ~Antoine de Saint-Exupery

  2. #22

    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    277
    Quote Originally Posted by Shootar401 View Post
    Any ideas on some B&W 35mm film that I can use on a P&S that doesn't accept filters or have a manual ASA selection? I'm not sure if there are any current B&W films that do not need a yellow filter to get a good separation of colours. Even better if it was something cheap like Kentmere or Arista
    TMAX 100 is advertised as having less of a need for yellow filtration. Check the data sheet at Kodak. It ain't cheap like Arista.

    My question is what are you doing with this camera? 35mm cameras are dirt cheap nowadays. You can get an excellent late model fancy SLR with a NEW nifty fifty lens for less than $200. Life is short.

    Also I would be very careful with the DX coding. I have definitely had some nice cameras have trouble with the DX coding on Efke cannisters. I'm pretty sure something like Kodak Tmax 100 won't give you any problems but beyond big names like that you better check and make sure everything is registering correctly.

    If you are going to have this camera for a while I would seriously think about investing in something less limiting.

  3. #23

    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Woodend, Australia
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    80
    I think St Ansel wrote something along the lines of "pan film needs a yellow filter for what the eye perceives as normal tones" in The Negative. It should be remembered that Ansel loved big dramatic dark skies in his photos, a tradition that seems to be alive and well with many photographers.

    Quote Originally Posted by jnanian View Post
    SNIP SNIP SNIP


    i think it was answell


    id go for the fedora
    It is said that we remember the important things, if true, why photograph? I forget, so I photograph.

  4. #24

    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    277
    Quote Originally Posted by markbau View Post
    I think St Ansel wrote something along the lines of "pan film needs a yellow filter for what the eye perceives as normal tones" in The Negative. It should be remembered that Ansel loved big dramatic dark skies in his photos, a tradition that seems to be alive and well with many photographers.
    A yellow filter will not produce a dramatic sky. I find the effect of basic yellow filters to be a bit too subtle. I actually prefer an orange filter and I an not scared to use a red filter if I feel it is justified. Although now I tend to also shoot an orange filter shot when I use red just in case it is too much. Heck I've used a red AND a polarizer at the same time. Greens are nice to lighten foliage while darkening the sky. But as has been said if you use a film like TMAX 100 it makes perfectly nice images without a filter. I will often rate TMAX 100 @ ISO 50 so if I am hand holding a filter of any sort is not an option. The world doesn't end in those circumstance. Photography like everything in life is about trade offs.

    Ansel used a red filter for his famous half dome picture. That was not a yellow filter.

    A basic yellow filter could never be called "dramatic" in my book.

  5. #25

    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Woodend, Australia
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    80
    A yellow filter will darken a blue sky compared to taking the same shot without a filter. The degree of darkening, yellow/orange/red is a matter of degrees.

    I'm sure TMax 100 makes perfectly nice images without a filter, as does any B&W film.

    Quote Originally Posted by Noble View Post
    A yellow filter will not produce a dramatic sky. I find the effect of basic yellow filters to be a bit too subtle. I actually prefer an orange filter and I an not scared to use a red filter if I feel it is justified. Although now I tend to also shoot an orange filter shot when I use red just in case it is too much. Heck I've used a red AND a polarizer at the same time. Greens are nice to lighten foliage while darkening the sky. But as has been said if you use a film like TMAX 100 it makes perfectly nice images without a filter. I will often rate TMAX 100 @ ISO 50 so if I am hand holding a filter of any sort is not an option. The world doesn't end in those circumstance. Photography like everything in life is about trade offs.

    Ansel used a red filter for his famous half dome picture. That was not a yellow filter.

    A basic yellow filter could never be called "dramatic" in my book.
    It is said that we remember the important things, if true, why photograph? I forget, so I photograph.

  6. #26
    jnanian's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    18,266
    Blog Entries
    15
    Images
    77
    Quote Originally Posted by markbau View Post
    I think St Ansel wrote something along the lines of "pan film needs a yellow filter for what the eye perceives as normal tones" in The Negative. It should be remembered that Ansel loved big dramatic dark skies in his photos, a tradition that seems to be alive and well with many photographers.

    hate to say this but yellow filters don't really darken the sky at all, maybe a tiny bit
    maybe enough to make clouds seem like they are there a bit more, but if your objective
    is to darken the sky, a yellow filter won't really do that ...

    the person i was responding to was talking about how in nearly 50 years of professional photography
    he really found no use for using filters, and i pretty much agree with him .. unless it is for a specialized purpose
    like contrast control with paper negatives, or making ilford SFX film do its thing ...
    i find the use of filters by a lot of "landscape" photographers to be heavy handed in the very least
    and a lot of the time kind of hackneyed and clichéd ... cheezy velvia nudes at slot canyon ...

    but what do i know ...

  7. #27
    Klainmeister's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Santa Fe, NM
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    1,493
    Images
    30
    Quote Originally Posted by jnanian View Post
    i find the use of filters by a lot of "landscape" photographers to be heavy handed in the very least
    and a lot of the time kind of hackneyed and clichéd ... cheezy velvia nudes at slot canyon ...

    but what do i know ...
    THAT'S where they keep em? Weird, I've spent a lot of time down in those places and never have come across any nudes. Maybe I need to look into Stone Donkey Canyon or Buckskin...
    K.S. Klain

  8. #28

    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Woodend, Australia
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    80
    It really depends on atmospheric conditions and on your definition of the word "darken" In summer we have very blue skies in inland Australia and a yellow filter can really darken the sky, closer to the ocean or in winter, when the sky isn't as blue a yellow filter will do very little.

    I rarely use filters (apart from ND) and amen to your comment about heavy handed photographers with the AA sky. I think the reason the older guys really went after sky darkening was a reaction to ortho films that made blue skies white, pan films came along and they wanted all the dark skies they could get, the darker the better.

    Quote Originally Posted by jnanian View Post
    hate to say this but yellow filters don't really darken the sky at all, maybe a tiny bit
    maybe enough to make clouds seem like they are there a bit more, but if your objective
    is to darken the sky, a yellow filter won't really do that ...

    the person i was responding to was talking about how in nearly 50 years of professional photography
    he really found no use for using filters, and i pretty much agree with him .. unless it is for a specialized purpose
    like contrast control with paper negatives, or making ilford SFX film do its thing ...
    i find the use of filters by a lot of "landscape" photographers to be heavy handed in the very least
    and a lot of the time kind of hackneyed and clichéd ... cheezy velvia nudes at slot canyon ...

    but what do i know ...
    It is said that we remember the important things, if true, why photograph? I forget, so I photograph.

  9. #29

    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    277
    Some of these comments are basically saying anyone who drinks is an alcoholic.

    A lot of good filtration is like a good haircut. No one can tell you've had one. If people are seeing portfolios full of nothing but black skies they are looking at a filter alcoholic. There are plenty of filter users that are not alcoholics. There is a lot of territory between cementing a red filter to your normal lens and being a teetotaler.

    Something else that I find disturbing about filters is there seems to be a large number of people who don't know what they are for. Yes they can darken skies and increase contrast but they can also be used to cut through haze, remove glare, hide or accentuate skin blemishes and also change the relationship between colors/shades of gray. Digital shooters and even some color film shooters (surprisingly) wonder why I shoot black and white. Well there are multiple reasons including dirt cheap easy developing and enlarging. But one big draw for B&W film is the use of filters. It is something that can't be done in other mediums. Polarization is the exception. If I want to take a picture of a landscape and cut through haze I can use an orange filter, red filter, polarizer or combine. The result simply cannot be achieved without the filters. Also if I want to lighten some spring foliage while darkening the sky a bit I use a green filter. Again it really can't be done any other way. There is Photoshoping but the results are usually poorer (noise, posterization, strange digital artifacts) and of course no darkroom print .

    The only thing I can say is people need to read about filters and then use them in various situations. You don't have to use a sledge hammer filter(s) in every situation. As markbau pointed out how dark your sky is also depends on geographic location/atmospheric conditions. I can take a picture of a landscape with an orange filter and have it look like an unfiltered picture taken in markbau's backyard. If my orange filter landscape is terrible then by definition everything marbau is taking in his geographic location is terrible at least in regards to how dark the sky is.

    Seriously I am not a filter guru. As I stated before I will shoot a scene with multiple filters and sometimes no filter just to be on the safe side. If you are shooting roll film I suggest playing around with different subject matter. Filtration to me is just another tool in the workflow. I would not ignore shutter speed, aperture, focus, tripod, cable release, flash, type of film, type of developer, type of paper or paper developer. They are all tools that give you some degree of control. I have found when used appropriately filters can add a lot to a photograph. Heck even when used "inappropriately" you can end up with something nice and unique even if it is not very realistic. And just as I would not have a portfolio full of blurry, expired film, light leak, Holga images I would not have a portfolio full of black skies. Drink responsibly.

  10. #30
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Minnesota
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    14,813
    Images
    300
    I sometimes use filters when I make portraits of people that have poor skin complexion. An orange filter might help someone with lots of skin blemishes, for example.

    I don't know why everybody is so hooked up on using filters only with skies. If you're in the woods photographing foliage, really striking results can be had by using green filters. Any time you photograph flowers and want to increase contrast between two complimentary colors, color filters can come very much in handy.

    Be creative with filters, use them to their strength and to improve your pictures according to how you want your photographs to look. I for one do not like the red filter sky much. Too much of the rest of the color spectrum gets rendered too damned wacky for my tastes.
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin