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  1. #31
    TheFlyingCamera's Avatar
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    Going back to the question of film, the Arista.EDU Ultra/Fomapan stuff is really more of an ortho/pan than a true panchromatic. It is very blue sensitive and somewhat deficient in red sensitivity. Don't think you'll be able to pull off that red filter sky look with it, or even get significant cloud/sky separation using a red filter.

  2. #32
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheFlyingCamera View Post
    Going back to the question of film, the Arista.EDU Ultra/Fomapan stuff is really more of an ortho/pan than a true panchromatic. It is very blue sensitive and somewhat deficient in red sensitivity. Don't think you'll be able to pull off that red filter sky look with it, or even get significant cloud/sky separation using a red filter.
    Thanks for keeping the post on track. I agree that the Arista.EDU Ultra / Fomapan films have a tendency to produce skies that are somewhat featureless, due to their spectral sensitivity. Beautiful film for portraits, though.

    Even though it might be a little surplus information at this point, Kodak TMax 400 has spectral response that acts like a built in filter to yield tones in bright blue skies, more so than other films I've tried. But it isn't hard to capture the sky if you wanted to with Tri-X or HP5+ either.
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

  3. #33
    Vaughn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Klainmeister View Post
    THAT'S where they keep em? Weird, I've spent a lot of time down in those places and never have come across any nudes. Maybe I need to look into Stone Donkey Canyon or Buckskin...
    One comes across them occasionally under the redwoods.

    Yellow, orange and red filters lighten blue skies relative to the rest of the landscape. Just look at one's negatives -- the skies have less density (lighter!) The brightness of skies in a print will depend on how much exposure one gives the paper. Sorry could not resist.



    My main filter use is a yellow filter in the Fall to darken (increase density) the representation of the yellows on the negative relative to the greens and browns...so that I can easily print them as white in the print.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Prairie Creek, Nude.jpg   Fallen Redwood, Nude_7"x19".jpg  
    At least with LF landscape, a bad day of photography can still be a good day of exercise.

  4. #34
    AgX
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    The use of a yellow came up with orthochromatic films, where a blue sky had more impact on exposure than with panchromatic film.

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