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  1. #11

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    Warmth must be in the eyes of the beholder. I think the second one has a very warm tone. :>)

    Neal Wydra

  2. #12
    TheFlyingCamera's Avatar
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    What I mean when I'm talking about warm is that I'm expecting blacks and mid tones with a chocolatey undertone. The highlights, especially on the first one, are definitely there, in the scan. I'll tell you that they're not that warm in the print, though. This is the problem with digitization of hard copies. I found that when trying to clean up the tones to match the original prints, I started getting some crossover and picking up other colors (greens in particular) that aren't there either, and are far less appealing.

  3. #13

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    I read a post recently which is now some years old by Les McLean where he gives the following for WT papers in general in LPD: 1+2 neutral warm brown and 1+1 very dark brown to brown black. No examples shown in his post but to say "very dark brown" has to mean something. Might be worth a try with LPD

    In my own experience Ilford WT paper in Ilford WT developer was only a very subtle brown. In fact as I was doing a run of prints with this combination I had difficulty seeing any brown tones after I had done a few prints until I compared prints done in MGIV with MG developer and then the difference was clear.

    pentaxuser

  4. #14

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    I used to mix a scratch batch of this warm tone developer for use with Ektalure. It gave very nice warm brown tones that turned a beautiful cool chocolate tone when toned in selenium. Yes, I know part of the equation is Ektalure, and Ilford warm tone paper is not as warm. Worth a try.

    GAF 135 Warm Tone Paper Developer

    Water: 750ml
    Metol: 1.6g
    Sodium Sulfite, dessicated: 24g
    Hydroquinone: 6.6g
    Sodium Carbonate, monohydrated: 24g
    Potassium Bromide: 2.8g*
    water to make: 1.0 liter total volume.

    Dilute 1:1 with water, develop 2-3 minutes at 68 degrees F. Dilute more for less contrast.

    *For warmer tone, Potassium Bromide may be increased up to 5.6 g/l. Do not exceed 5.6 g/liter.

    I usually used it at 5g/l of KBR.

    I think this formula came from the old Photo-Lab Index.

  5. #15
    Greg Davis's Avatar
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    I am about to embark on continuing a graduate school project of printing the same negative on several papers with several different develpers and toners. This time I want to use Ilford WT, so I will let you know which combinations get warm.
    www.gregorytdavis.com

    Did millions of people suddenly disappear? This may have an answer.

    "No one knows that day or hour, not even the angels in heaven, nor the Son, but only the Father." -Matthew 24:36

  6. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by pentaxuser View Post
    I read a post recently which is now some years old by Les McLean where he gives the following for WT papers in general in LPD: 1+2 neutral warm brown and 1+1 very dark brown to brown black. No examples shown in his post but to say "very dark brown" has to mean something. Might be worth a try with LPD

    In my own experience Ilford WT paper in Ilford WT developer was only a very subtle brown. In fact as I was doing a run of prints with this combination I had difficulty seeing any brown tones after I had done a few prints until I compared prints done in MGIV with MG developer and then the difference was clear.

    pentaxuser
    Here's MGWT in LPD stock, I can smell the chocolate

    http://www.apug.org/gallery1/showima...imageuser=3613

  7. #17
    brian steinberger's Avatar
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    Why not just tone in a polysulfide toner, like Viradon, or Kodak brown toner? Beautiful chocolate brown tones..

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by brian steinberger View Post
    Why not just tone in a polysulfide toner, like Viradon, or Kodak brown toner? Beautiful chocolate brown tones..
    I could. A: I don't have any in stock right now, B: I was trying to use what's on hand, C: I wanted to see what could be done with the papers/developers at hand. I just did some prints this morning with the Bergger COT320 and the Ilford Warmtone developer, and they really aren't much different, except that the Bergger emulsion is a LOT slower than the Ilford (a good 2 stops slower). When the prints are dry, I'll scan in one to post.

  9. #19

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    I have cooled off the highlights on Warmtone (in Warmtone) by using a potassium ferricyanide / potassium bromide bleach and then redeveloped in the same developer. Partial bleaching leaves warmer shadows by comparison.

    In theory substituting sodium chloride (adjusted proportion) for the potassium bromide is supposed to give a warmer tone on redevelopment, but my initial experiments have been inconclusive. I need to try again - I could use a warmer tone short of sepia processing or the reddish effect of selenium with this paper. of course, with my colour vision the effect has to be quite blatant 8-)
    I feel, therefore I photograph.

  10. #20
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    Click image for larger version. 

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    Here is a print with Bergger VCCB in Ilford Warmtone. Noticeably warmer (still not chocolate, but definitely not cool tone).

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