Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,549   Posts: 1,544,608   Online: 766
      
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 12 of 12
  1. #11

    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Posts
    1,650
    Images
    5
    Good Morning, Andrewmoodie,

    For T-Max 100 (favorite film) and T-Max 400, my processing times are generally the same for 35mm and 120/220. For the same films in 4 x 5, I'll generally reduce the time by 10% to 20% (for "normal" development) but only because I use a drum and the agitation is continuous. The other posting above are also correct to note that there can be slight changes in time with some films; checking the film data sheet is a good idea, at least as a starting point.

    Konical

  2. #12

    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Southern California
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,879
    Images
    11
    I agree with Konical and would add that development times should be viewed as starting points. You should always expect to do some testing in order to tune the development process for your film, chemistry, equipment, end use (printing, projection, scanning, etc.) and personal preferences.
    Tom Hoskinson
    ______________________________

    Everything is analog - even digital :D

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin