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  1. #1
    marko_trebusak's Avatar
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    manual developing tank for 4x5

    I'm looking for a manual developing tank that can be used like tanks for developing 35 mm or 120 films. I don't have a darkroom, so it should be usable in daylight (load the holders in the dark, and then turn the lights on for souping). I was searching around and findthis. What do you think?

    Best regards
    Marko

  2. #2

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    You could try one of these too. I'm sure the B&H can get one for you.

    I've never used one, but it is an alternative to the system you're looking at.

  3. #3

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    Marko,

    I borrowed one of those a few months ago and I don't plan on giving it back. I've never used the pour spout thingy, just open it up to dump and fill.

    Very easy to use good for stand and semistand development as well. Weird to load at first though.

    Happy Days
    Mark
    You can't be lost if you don't care where you are.

  4. #4
    roteague's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by etriplett
    You could try one of these too. I'm sure the B&H can get one for you.

    I've never used one, but it is an alternative to the system you're looking at.
    I've used one for several years and they are excellent; easy to load and process well. However, they are designed to be used with the Jobo processor, not as a stand alone. I haven't tried using a different type of rotating base for it, although I imagine you could try.
    Robert M. Teague
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    "A man who works with his hands is a laborer; a man who works with his hands and his brain is a craftsman; a man who works with his hands and his brain and his heart is an artist" -- Louis Nizer

  5. #5
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    I have a friend who really likes the HP Combi Plan tank. I use an old stainless steel Nikor tank, and I believe that Jobo makes a similar type 4x5" inversion tank in plastic. Very few people seem to like the Yankee tanks, so I'd avoid those.
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
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  6. #6
    papagene's Avatar
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    I use the HP Combi Plan tank and like it. And I don't use the spout-thingy to pour chems into the tank. I pull of the lid off (in total darkness) and pour the chems in that way, which may not suit you because of no darkroom.
    But I do highly recommend this tank.

    gene
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  7. #7

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    I use Jobo 2500 type tanks and 2509N reels [I think that's the right model number] They work just fine on a motorbase. Or you can use them on a real Jobo machine. Or you could use them like a normal inversion tank. With inversion they take a lot more chemicals. I don't think Jobo even mentions this method with those tanks. OTOH it seems older 2500 tanks mentioned it on the side. At least they provided chemical volume numbers.

    One advantage of the 2500 is the same tank can do any film size up to 4x5. So if you have the roll film reels it's possible to process 35mm,120,220,127 [46mm],6x9,9x12 and 4x5. The roll film reels handle the roll film sizes. The sheet film reel handles the various sheet film sizes. You can also change to a print lid and use the same tank for prints. Or you can add an extension to a small [or big tank if you really need it] and process more film or bigger prints.

    It's nice to buy one thing and not be told you need to buy something totally different when you have different needs.

  8. #8

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    Good Evening, Marko,

    There have been a lot of previous APUG postings on the topic of sheet film developing. Taking the time to do a thorough search should give you a lot of information.

    Konical

  9. #9
    MikeS's Avatar
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    I currently have a Nikor 4x5 tank/reel as well as the HP CombiPlan-T tank, as well as a Jobo 2561 tank with 2 reels. Of them my favorite is the Nikor tank/reel, followed by the Jobo if I use my unicolor base for constant agitation, I'll go with the Jobo tank/reels. For intermittent agitation I use the Nikor.

    The Combi-tank has one main advantage over the Nikor, it's still available new, while the Nikors are only available used, and used products can vary widely in condition. My first Nikor tank made me wonder why lots of folks say how wonderful they are, as it was hard to load, and hard to unload, but when I got my second one that was in much nicer shape I found out why they're so nice!

    -Mike

  10. #10
    noseoil's Avatar
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    Marko, you might also consider making some development tubes from a plumbing supply store's materials. They are just black plastic drain pipe with a cap on one end and a removable plug in the other. You would have to work in a blacked out bathroom or something similar at night to handle film, but these tubes give very even development, are cheap to make and are easy to use.

    Get some 40mm or 50mm inside diameter drain line and cut it into 150mm lengths. Then glue a cap on one end and find a screw in type of plug fitting for the other end, this lets you work in a lighted room once the film is loaded. A water bath is used to keep temperatures constant and the tubes just float and spin in the water.

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