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  1. #11

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    Personally, I use two fixer baths but if the 11x14 print is important why not wait to print it when more fixer is available. In the meantime make a good 8x10 or at least an 8x10 work print.

    http://www.jeffreyglasser.com/

  2. #12

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    1:9 + one extra minute will be plenty enough! Especially in freshly mixed fixer.

    Absolutely no worries!

  3. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rudeofus View Post
    Do you have any data to back this up? From what I know, fixation is anything but a first order reaction, see here, especially pages 3 and 4.
    A pseudo first order reaction is not a first order reaction. It just proceeds at nearly the same rate when one reactant is in large quantities compared to the other reactant and you don't have lots of reaction products forcing equilibrium in the opposite direction. The example you gave does not fit this model because fixer near exhaustion has a lower concentration of thiosulfate (reactant) and a significant concentration of reaction products.

    This is just a simplification using conditions present with fresh unused fixer so that real people who don't know how to solve second order differential equations and don't have an analytical chemistry lab to measure precise starting solution concentrations can come somewhat close. You can make it as complicated or as simple as you wish. But don't take my word for it. Clock your clearing time in fresh fixer then dilute it 1:1 and see if twice the fixing time clears your clip.

  4. #14
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    Honestly, I don't even bother producing final prints without two fixing baths, both of which are known quantities, both in volume, and usage capacity. If I am making prints for exhibition or portfolio purposes, I use two trays of film strength rapid fixer, for 45 seconds each. The first fix is discarded or put away for disposal after 3 work sessions, and the second tray becomes the first fix for the following 3 sessions, with a brand new batch of film-strength fix being made to replace it. I find with this method that I get complete, archival fixation, with very little thiosulfate actually absorbing into the fibers of the paper, meaning that I only have to do a quick rinse, a three minute soak in Permawash, Selenium toning, and then a 30 minute wash in my print washer, which is a SaltHill cross-current washer with the quick dump panel. Every 10 minutes, I dump the balance of the water in the washer, and let it refill with totally fresh water. So three or four changes of water over the course of 30-45 minutes.

    The longer the print is in fixer, especially previously used fixer, the more residual silver will seep back into the print as the paper must remain immersed for a greater amount of time. You really don't want to have your prints in fix for a combined time greater than 2-3 minutes at the most. A minute to a minute and a half is preferable.
    See my work at my website CHRISTOPHER LANGE PHOTOGRAPHY

    or my snaps at my blog MINIMUM DENSITY
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  5. #15
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    Does this effect of silver seeping into paper also happen with film emulsion? Will you actually fog film if you over-fix it?


    ~Stone | Sent w/ iPhone using Tapatalk
    ~Stone | "...of course, that's just my opinion. I could be wrong." ~Dennis Miller

  6. #16
    Chris Lange's Avatar
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    I suppose theoretically it could, but it I would think it is far more difficult to achieve / far less likely to happen. As you know, film and RC papers have only a shade of the absorption capacity that baryta and rag papers do, and even then they wash far more easily due to the non-porous nature of the materials. Everything I said above applies basically exclusively to FB or Cotton papers like ART300.
    See my work at my website CHRISTOPHER LANGE PHOTOGRAPHY

    or my snaps at my blog MINIMUM DENSITY
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    If you don't have it, then you don't have it.

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