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  1. #1

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    Stretching Fixer.

    I have made a big boo-boo. I thought I had an extra bottle of Ilford Fixer. I was wrong. I want to make an 11X14 but only have enough fixer to do a fair job of filling an 8X10 tray. Can I add a bit of water or will that dilute it to much to be usable. Any other tricks anyone knows of will be appreciated. Thanks, Don

  2. #2
    Kevin Kehler's Avatar
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    You can dilute it more but then it needs to be in the fixer longer. If you add 25% more water (go from 4 liters to 5 liters), I would add 25% more time to the fix cycle and 50% more time to the wash cycle. If the paper is RC, it is not too bad but fiber paper, the longer it is in the fixer, the more it is absorbed into the paper and the greater chance of archival instability. Be sure to recalculate how much life expectancy you have as 5 liters of diluted fixer will not properly fix the same amount as 5 liters of non-diluted fixer.

    If you have a rotary drum, you could use that for fixing the print and it would require less fixer.
    Once a photographer is convinced that the camera can lie and that, strictly speaking, the vast majority of photographs are "camera lies," inasmuch as they tell only part of a story or tell it in a distorted form, half the battle is won. Once he has conceded that photography is not a "naturalistic" medium of rendition and that striving for "naturalism" in a photograph is futile, he can turn his attention to using a camera to make more effective pictures.

    Andreas Feininger

  3. #3
    MattKing's Avatar
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    Do you have any Beseler or Cibachrome developing tubes big enough for an 11 x 14?

    You can also use an 8 x 10 tray, and the same technique as mural printers use to develop large sheets - roll develop the print.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  4. #4

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    Yes, I do have Ilfochrome tubes that are that large and even larger. Largest Ilfochrome I can make is 20X24.

    Thanks guys, great ideas, Don

  5. #5
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    Why wouldn't one be able to use a tray to achieve the same approach as a drum with less chemicals? It's not as if the surface has to be round to get liquid coverage across everything - it just won't be covered entirely at once. That doesn't seem any different than a drum.
    Stop worrying about grain, resolution, sharpness, and everything else that doesn't have a damn thing to do with substance.

    http://www.flickr.com/kediwah

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    I've tried this. If the chemical is *just* enough for 8x10 tray, it will be very VERY difficult to make sure all the paper surface is covered. Sloshing it around is pretty risky as one won't know if the whole surface is sufficiently fixed until it's way too late.

    I wouldn't do it. If I had to, I'd rather dilute what's available more and chance it.
    Develop, stop, fix.... wait.... where's my film?

  7. #7
    clayne's Avatar
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    I think it's because most trays have the gutters on the bottom. If using a flat tray (which most of us don't) it'd probably work out fine.
    Stop worrying about grain, resolution, sharpness, and everything else that doesn't have a damn thing to do with substance.

    http://www.flickr.com/kediwah

  8. #8

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    I think fixing silver bromide in excess sodium thiosulfate may reasonably be assumed to be a pseudo first order reaction. The concentration of unfixed silver at time (t) would = initial concentration of silver times e to the power of (-k times concentration of thiosulfate times t). So half the concentration of fixer means double the fixing time. Well, close enough, anyway.

  9. #9

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    Good point. I really appreciate the help. I must have really had my head up where the sun don't shine to screw up this badly. Real problem is I can't blame anyone but me for this jolly bit of stupidity.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Clovis Blevins View Post
    I think fixing silver bromide in excess sodium thiosulfate may reasonably be assumed to be a pseudo first order reaction. The concentration of unfixed silver at time (t) would = initial concentration of silver times e to the power of (-k times concentration of thiosulfate times t). So half the concentration of fixer means double the fixing time. Well, close enough, anyway.
    Do you have any data to back this up? From what I know, fixation is anything but a first order reaction, see here, especially pages 3 and 4.
    Trying to be the best of whatever I am, even if what I am is no good.

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