Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 71,930   Posts: 1,585,422   Online: 1040
      
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 17
  1. #1

    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    166

    Silver, Gold, Platinum, and Palladium Prices

    Gold closed today at $1276, silver at $1954, platinum at $1349, and palladium at $665. Gold and silver were both down today with platinum and palladium both being up in price. While all 4 metals, which are used in varying amounts by film photographers and printers, are down substantially over the past year the raw cost to us in terms of film or toning solutions have remained constant if not to have increased. While I can see some justification for film (a decreasing market and the continued high cost of maintaining the production infrastructure), I don't see why the cost of the other three metals have remained (in my case) constant or to have increased. Does anyone have an answer to this?
    Thomas

    No art passes our conscience in the way that film does, and goes directly to our feelings, deep down into the dark rooms of our souls.
    — Ingmar Bergman

  2. #2

    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    US
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    2,060
    That quandary may well be better suited for a market forum. I suggest the wisest answer I could give on this forum; is that logic and sense is not abounding these days.

  3. #3

    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    34
    The price of gold and other commodity metals didn't really go up when benchmarked against other raw materials, energy, food, etc. What really happened is the value of major currencies fell. Don't think "how much is an ounce of gold worth today?" It's the same gold that's been valued for millennia. The question to ask is "how much of this volatile currency does it take today to purchase an ounce of gold?" Now I sound like a late night tv commercial for coins! Feel free to slide this into the misc. category.

  4. #4
    Eugen Mezei's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    96
    But that's exactly the problem of the OP. Why his currency gets lesser chemical today if the producer gets for the same currency more raw material.

  5. #5
    jp498's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Owls Head ME
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,467
    Images
    74
    The film we're buying now could have been made a year or two ago and kept frozen and chopped and sent to B&H/Freestyle/Adorama/wherever last week. It's probably not a just-in-time inventory business. We just don't know.

    They've probably also hedged their silver to avoid increases which means they avoid some of the decreases too. Southwest for example hedges on jet fuel, and when companies do that they are less likely to be put out of business from supply cost volatility.

    They also have no need to lower their prices if costs go down. It's not a regulated utility. It's a business that will lower their prices if they have to or if it makes sense to.

  6. #6

    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    North Yorkshire, England
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    724
    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Taylor View Post
    Gold closed today at $1276, silver at $1954, platinum at $1349, and palladium at $665. Gold and silver were both down today with platinum and palladium both being up in price. While all 4 metals, which are used in varying amounts by film photographers and printers, are down substantially over the past year the raw cost to us in terms of film or toning solutions have remained constant if not to have increased. While I can see some justification for film (a decreasing market and the continued high cost of maintaining the production infrastructure), I don't see why the cost of the other three metals have remained (in my case) constant or to have increased. Does anyone have an answer to this?
    I am not sure if I follow your figures. Are they all priced per ounce? If so why is silver priced higher than Gold and Platinum - a typo?

  7. #7

    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    166
    Quote Originally Posted by BMbikerider View Post
    I am not sure if I follow your figures. Are they all priced per ounce? If so why is silver priced higher than Gold and Platinum - a typo?
    $19.54. I left the decimal out.

    Thomas
    Thomas

    No art passes our conscience in the way that film does, and goes directly to our feelings, deep down into the dark rooms of our souls.
    — Ingmar Bergman

  8. #8

    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Portland, Oregon
    Posts
    1,344
    Given the amount of silver in a roll or sheet of film, I would think it's a small fraction of the cost of manufacture, distribution and retailing. The cost of all the other raw materials going into film increases as well, and I would think it increases faster the smaller the volume the manufacturers' purchases become. What once was a high-volume business has become a niche market, and the economies of scale aren't as substantial as in the past.

    Buy it while you can. The cost will never come down.

  9. #9

    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    166
    As I stated earlier, I can understand the cost for film. But besides film, I also purchase silver nitrate, gold chloride, potassium chloroplatinite and sodium palladium. It's their cost that has not budged with the declining market prices.
    Thomas

    No art passes our conscience in the way that film does, and goes directly to our feelings, deep down into the dark rooms of our souls.
    — Ingmar Bergman

  10. #10

    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    965
    Images
    101
    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Taylor View Post
    As I stated earlier, I can understand the cost for film. But besides film, I also purchase silver nitrate, gold chloride, potassium chloroplatinite and sodium palladium. It's their cost that has not budged with the declining market prices.
    Probably because your supplier's costs don't turn on a dime, either. The big drop in commodity prices has been just in the past few weeks. Your suppliers may still be using materials they purchased (or bought contracts for) prior to that.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin