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  1. #11
    Sirius Glass's Avatar
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    I prefer XTOL replenished to develop film for better tonality and finer grain, but I have not tried it with B&W reversal. I would suspect that XTOL will provide finer grain than Dektol for slides. Dektol is a paper developer.
    Warning!! Handling a Hasselblad can be harmful to your financial well being!

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  2. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sirius Glass View Post
    I prefer XTOL replenished to develop film for better tonality and finer grain, but I have not tried it with B&W reversal. I would suspect that XTOL will provide finer grain than Dektol for slides. Dektol is a paper developer.
    Indeed, paper developers are used in reversal processing because they are stronger than film developers which are too weak and give grey slides.

    The developer recommended for reversal processing is Kodak D-19.

  3. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by destroya View Post
    1) first developer 12 minutes with continuous agitation in Dektol 1+1 and 7ml hypo mixture which is made up from 7 grams of sodium thiosulfate in 250 ml of distilled water. then a 2 min wash replacing water every 30 seconds
    I think that level of sodium tiosulfate in your 1st dev is very low. Typically value must be 3-8g/l. More preferred use potassium thiocyanate in concentration 2g/l. Without correct amount of halide solvent such as tiosulfate/thiocyanate you always have dark highlight.
    good starting point is here

  4. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by Relayer View Post
    I think that level of sodium tiosulfate in your 1st dev is very low. Typically value must be 3-8g/l. More preferred use potassium thiocyanate in concentration 2g/l. Without correct amount of halide solvent such as tiosulfate/thiocyanate you always have dark highlight.
    good starting point is here
    This isn't true, one can get perfectly nice and bright bw slides without using silver halide solvent. It's my experience with Tri-X super 8. However, some films require some silver halide solvent, in my case it is the Fomapan R. It really depends on the film (how it is rich in silver, for example), and on the water you use (if tap water, then it is different everywhere ).
    I use around 5g/L of KSCN, but that means nothing : you have to find out your own amount to add to make it work. Don't add too much otherwise you will lose density. Experiment.

  5. #15

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    Is it possible to judge from a first development only what the appropriate time and amount of hypo is for a particular film?

    It would shorten the experimental cycle somewhat if one could simply run short lengths of film through a first developer, using differing amounts of hypo, then inspect to see which combination has the best potential.

    What would one be looking for in a negative after first development that would indicate that it would make a good quality reversal?

    Or is this akin to suggesting one would have to be looking for something that isn't there yet ?

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tofek View Post
    Indeed, paper developers are used in reversal processing because they are stronger than film developers which are too weak and give grey slides.

    The developer recommended for reversal processing is Kodak D-19.
    Ah-ha! Ok.
    Warning!! Handling a Hasselblad can be harmful to your financial well being!

    Nothing beats a great piece of glass!

    I leave the digital work for the urologists and proctologists.

  7. #17
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    did another try this time with the same films. again panf+ really dark. but the extreme 100 came out perfect. very fine grain and a nice looking slide. for $30 a 100 foot roll i might call it a day and stay with what has worked for a while. then tackle panf at a later time
    Last edited by destroya; 07-07-2013 at 10:31 AM. Click to view previous post history.

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