Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 69,895   Posts: 1,520,935   Online: 922
      
Results 1 to 8 of 8
  1. #1

    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    California
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    34
    Images
    6

    High temperature effect on Black and White Silver Geleatin Negatives

    Hello,

    Wondering if anyone has any information on the effect of high temperatures on already processed negatives and prints. I recently moved, we are located in Southern California. I used to store my negatives and prints inside our air conditioned house with no problems. Now with the move I'm running into space issues in the house. I was going to store them in our garage where I will build my darkroom. But I'm finding temperatures in the garage are reaching 96 degrees Fahrenheit. The Relative Humidity is about 30% where I'm at until the winter rains. Don't think I'm going to be working in those temps. I do all my darkroom work in the mornings when it's in the 70's or so until winter time when things cool off. Anyways, just wondering on the long term effects of storing Black and White Silver Gelatin negatives and prints that have already been fully processed in temperatures like that. Luckily I have a spare fridge to store my new film in so that's not a problem.

    Thanks for any info,

    Ted

  2. #2

    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Penfield, NY
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    982
    I would certainly worry about storing photographic chemicals under those conditions.

  3. #3

    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    California
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    34
    Images
    6
    Chemicals I never had a problem with previously. The Darkroom I was working in would reach 90+ degrees consistently.

    Worked in it for 10 years with no chemical problems. I'm able to control the temp of the chemicals while working and avoid working when extremely hot. Only Chemicals I would store would be Fix, Selenium, and Stop. Everything else is just one time use.

  4. #4
    Rick A's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    north central Pa
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    5,816
    Images
    31
    High heat and humidity could cause prints and negatives to stick to each other or to the dividers and sleeves.I have seen this with materials stored in attics of old homes, and the damage is extensive at times.
    Rick A
    Argentum aevum
    BTW: the big kid in my avatar is my hero, my son, who proudly serves us in the Navy. "SALUTE"

  5. #5

    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Kentucky
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    210
    Had a lab where tap water was about 100 deg F. Used ice baths to temper film development so rated speeds and times could be used. Big jumps in temp between steps will clump the grain. Ilford says stay within 5 deg. step to step. I like one or two max. For printing temperature was not much of an issue as they were high and all the same.

  6. #6

    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Richmond, VA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,066
    The OP question is interesting, about storage of processed and already dried negs. To Rick's comment - I wonder how much of the problem was humidity rather than temperature (sticking). I'd like to hear from PE on this.

    (to the "kid" - "SALUTE"+)

  7. #7

    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    San Clemente, California
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,057
    Don't be mislead by the title reference to color; everything you need to know is here:


  8. #8

    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    California
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    34
    Images
    6
    Thanks, I'll dig into this and see what I can find out.



 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin