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Thread: Wish me luck!

  1. #1
    omaha's Avatar
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    Wish me luck!

    Well, the chemistry arrived, so I'm going to try my first batch of B&W in 30 years tonight.

    I've got a roll of FP4 all ready to go.

    Pulling from various Ilford data sheets, I came up with this procedure:

    Developer (Ilfosol 3):
    Mix 1:9
    Develop at 68 degrees
    4:15
    Invert four times during first ten seconds
    Tap on table
    Invert four times during 10 seconds of each subsequent 60 second interval
    Start to drain off 10 seconds early, then immediately add STOP
    Throw away afterward


    STOPPER (Ilfostop):
    Mix 1:19
    Use at 64-75 degrees
    Only needed for 10 seconds, although longer does not hurt
    Reusable : Changes from yellow to purple when exhausted


    Fixer (Ilford Rapid Fixer):
    Mix 1:4
    Use at 64-75 degrees
    Three minutes
    Same inversion and tapping schedule as with developer
    Save for reuse.


    Wash:
    Rinse under running water in sink at same approx temperature for five or ten minutes
    Add a few drops of photoflo in final wash

    Easy peasey, right?

    Am I missing anything?

  2. #2
    paul_c5x4's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by omaha View Post
    Developer (Ilfosol 3):
    Mix 1:9
    Develop at 68 degrees
    4:15

    STOPPER (Ilfostop):
    Mix 1:19

    I would suggest using Ilfosol-3 at 1+14 and developing for 7:30 - You have a little more latitude on your timings. 4:15 is a pretty short development time, and you need to make sure you are bang on to get consistent results. At 7:30, ten seconds either way is not so much of a problem.
    For a cheap stop, a teaspoon of citric acid from a chemist or grocery store works just as well and can be dumped at the end of each session.

  3. #3
    eddie's Avatar
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    Unless you're using Perma-Wash, I think your final wash time is too short.

  4. #4
    paul_c5x4's Avatar
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    Ilford recommended wash times with a non-hardening fixer is 5-10 min. That said, I usually do mine for around 20 min with a final rinse in Ilfotol/Photoflo

  5. #5
    omaha's Avatar
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    Thanks for the comments, everyone.

    I have what I think is a dumb question...maybe you can point me to a resource to study up on this....

    I get that more concentration in the developer gets you "more", and I get that more time also gets you "more", and I assume that higher temperature gets you "more".

    More what?

    What is the difference between "over-developed" and "under-developed" film?

  6. #6
    MattKing's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by omaha View Post
    Thanks for the comments, everyone.

    I have what I think is a dumb question...maybe you can point me to a resource to study up on this....

    I get that more concentration in the developer gets you "more", and I get that more time also gets you "more", and I assume that higher temperature gets you "more".

    More what?

    What is the difference between "over-developed" and "under-developed" film?
    This website may give help you answer your excellent (not dumb!) question: http://www.ephotozine.com/article/as...negatives-4682

    The illustrations therein suffer slightly from being reproduced on the web, but I think that it is still helpful.

    In essence, more development makes the negative more dense, and increases contrast.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  7. #7
    omaha's Avatar
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    Perfect! Thanks!

  8. #8
    omaha's Avatar
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    Ok, well that was a bust.

    Followed the procedure as precisely as I could. I was within a half a degree and a few seconds on all counts.

    The result: Nothing. Bupkis. Zilch. Nada. A nice strip of beautiful, perfectly clear film.

    Hmmm....

    I guess the first thing to figure out is if I have a developing problem or a camera problem.

    The little strip along the edge that says "Ilford" DID come out. Does that suggest a camera problem?

  9. #9
    MattKing's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by omaha View Post
    Ok, well that was a bust.

    Followed the procedure as precisely as I could. I was within a half a degree and a few seconds on all counts.

    The result: Nothing. Bupkis. Zilch. Nada. A nice strip of beautiful, perfectly clear film.

    Hmmm....

    I guess the first thing to figure out is if I have a developing problem or a camera problem.

    The little strip along the edge that says "Ilford" DID come out. Does that suggest a camera problem?
    A camera problem. Which includes the subsets of "left the lenscap on my rangefinder" problem and "didn't set the synch right for my flash" problem and the "didn't load the film correctly" problem.

    Or a "developed the wrong film" problem.

    Did the very end of the film come out dark?
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  10. #10
    omaha's Avatar
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    No, its beautifully clear from end to end.

    I take it the "Ilford" along the edge is "developed" on to the film?

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