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Thread: Chemical mixing

  1. #11

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    You can use ANY container that's large enough to hold the required amount of water and easy to pour in and out the ingredients. I use an Orange Juice jug with a plastic stirrer made out of a broken coat hanger.

    For a fixer, which I use liquid concentrate, I just pour it into a storage jug directly and add required amount of water, cap and shake.

    You *can* actually shake mix the developer in the jug as well because if you CAP it and the bottle is nearly full, there's no more oxygen getting in. BUT, developers are not that easy to dissolve. Your arm will be awfully tired before you are done. Plus, you have no way of knowing when to stop if your bottle isn't clear.
    Develop, stop, fix.... wait.... where's my film?

  2. #12
    MattKing's Avatar
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    Some plastics absorb chemistry, so it is wise to avoid re-using them with different chemicals. I would think that the 4 litre plastic milk jugs we get here would be particularly bad for that.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by MattKing View Post
    Some plastics absorb chemistry, so it is wise to avoid re-using them with different chemicals. I would think that the 4 litre plastic milk jugs we get here would be particularly bad for that.
    I usually toss them when done - they're "free" with milk. I'm lactose intolerant, though, so usually have to get them from other people.
    Truzi

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by MattKing View Post
    Some plastics absorb chemistry, so it is wise to avoid re-using them with different chemicals. I would think that the 4 litre plastic milk jugs we get here would be particularly bad for that.
    I store some chemistry in milk jugs but I only use them as one-shot.

    If you buy distilled water from the store, it often comes in plastic jugs. Since they contain the amount of water you need to mix a 1 gal./4L batch, they are the right size to store the chems in.
    Mix up a batch in your chosen vessel, pour it into the jug, label it and store it for use. When it's empty, toss it in the recycle bin. (Wash well first.) You'll get a new jug for your next batch of chems when you buy another jug of water.

    Easy and cheap!
    Randy S.

    In girum imus nocte et consumimur igni.

    -----

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/randystankey/

  5. #15
    Bill Burk's Avatar
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    If I were a better artist... I was thinking of making a series of cocktail napkins, 50's style.

    One image I had in mind was a guy sitting at the bar of a brewpub, eyeing the copper vats with Dektol in mind.

  6. #16

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    I mix (speaking of one gallon) in the same container that I use for storage of the chems. I specifically use the plastic containers received when I purchase and use windshield washing fluid for the horseless carriage. The plastic in these containers is many times thicker than a common milk jug. For mixing dry chems I fill the jug 3/4 with hot water, pour in the chems, cap it, and shake like the Dickens. Then I top it off. Note, I would not recommend plastic milk jugs for storage. I've had one of those develop a pin hole and drain completely onto the darkroom bench and floor. A lovely mess indeed.
    Last edited by DannL; 07-04-2013 at 12:24 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  7. #17

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    "homer bucket" from homer despot

  8. #18
    fotch's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gerald C Koch View Post
    A magnetic stirrer is the best darkroom buy I ever made. I use a one liter pyrex lab beaker when mixing for its flat bottom which is necessary with a mag stirring bar.

    An open container and a stirring paddle is a cheaper but more athletic option.
    What I have found also.
    Items for sale or trade at www.Camera35.com

  9. #19
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    Typical 10-12L bucket and some kind of stirrer.
    Stop worrying about grain, resolution, sharpness, and everything else that doesn't have a damn thing to do with substance.

    http://www.flickr.com/kediwah

  10. #20

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    There are no secrets to mixing, simply follow the instructions with the product or, if there are no clear instructions included, look on the IlfordPhoto web site for their mixing suggestions for a similar product.

    The container can best be an appropriately sized bucket (I think that is a "pail" in american). For stirring I have a couple of paint stirrers - one for developers, one for fixers and the rest. Of course, keep the bucket(s) clean and use it only for photo-chemical mixing, not collecting horse-manure for the garden or something . . .

    Anyone reading from outside the USA, note too that what a lot of people have called a "jug" in this thread seems to be the american meaning of the word, not the british/european version.

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