Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,333   Posts: 1,537,415   Online: 1156
      
Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 21 to 30 of 35

Thread: Chemical mixing

  1. #21

    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Kentucky
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    210
    For my large format update 5 liter graduated plastic pitcher and a left behind top of a cake keeper. Magnetic stirrer added recently from auction site. Plastic bucket with pour spot has been my friend for years. 35 mm days, plastic 2 qt pitcher and a long plastic spoon, precision measurement by cup and quart pyrex kitchen measuring cup. Graduates came later.

  2. #22
    clayne's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    San Francisco, CA | Kuching, MY | Jakarta, ID
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,838
    Images
    57
    We call it a "bucket" in America but also understand pail.
    Stop worrying about grain, resolution, sharpness, and everything else that doesn't have a damn thing to do with substance.

    http://www.flickr.com/kediwah

  3. #23
    Truzi's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Ohio, USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,024
    In the U.S. we use both bucket and pail, though the latter is usually smaller (and sometimes more used by children or the older generation in my experience).

    Which British/European "jug" are you referencing? We have a few very common uses for that word as well.
    Truzi

  4. #24

    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    NE USA
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    207
    Quote Originally Posted by MattKing View Post
    Some plastics absorb chemistry, so it is wise to avoid re-using them with different chemicals. I would think that the 4 litre plastic milk jugs we get here would be particularly bad for that.
    I'm thinking of using a dedicated developer tub. Then for the rest just use the gallon plastic bottles and shake to mix it. The developer is the only one that is not supposed to be shaked from what I gather.

    Once the developer is mixed can the life be extended by storing in the fridge?

  5. #25
    MattKing's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Delta, British Columbia, Canada
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    12,300
    Images
    60
    Quote Originally Posted by Iluvmycam View Post
    I'm thinking of using a dedicated developer tub. Then for the rest just use the gallon plastic bottles and shake to mix it. The developer is the only one that is not supposed to be shaked from what I gather.

    Once the developer is mixed can the life be extended by storing in the fridge?
    Developer will suffer from oxidation if the plastic is at all porous. Milk jugs wouldn't be my recommendation for developer storage, although good quality plastic beverage bottles are probably fine.

    And as for refrigeration - I would advise against it for black and white developer. You don't want any of the chemicals to precipitate out.

    Just keep developer in a cool, dry environment. Dark is good, subdued light is probably fine.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  6. #26

    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    903
    Quote Originally Posted by Truzi View Post
    In the U.S. we use both bucket and pail, though the latter is usually smaller (and sometimes more used by children or the older generation in my experience).

    Which British/European "jug" are you referencing? We have a few very common uses for that word as well.
    It seems that the milk or fruit juice containers ('bottle' in Brit-speak, as it would have a sealing closure of some sort) are referred to as 'jugs' on the West of the Atlantic while UK usage would have a 'jug' as an open-topped container with a spout and a handle, for pouring the contents out under control. Clearly one of these wouldn't be much good for storing any photo-chemical, and could lead to someone "learning from the internet" and perhaps sticking a bit of cling-film over an open topped container and thinking that was optimal.

    Both 'buckets' and 'pails' are also used on this side of the water, but in my experience pail is much less used and is more often a bit archaic - not unlike what Truzi describes. I'm unclear what a 'tub' is in american - here it would be something for garden-plants or perhaps ice-cream (I'm assuming that this isn't referring to storage in a bath). There are also the well known differences in the size of pints and gallons to contend with! Not to mention differences between ounces and fluid-ounces. It's amazing anything works at all.

    The PET plastic disposable bottles used for fizzy designer water seem to make a very good oxygen-proof container for developers.

    One handy protective idea is to place your chemical storage containers in a tray (garden, kitchen or photographic variety and with enough capacity to hold one or two leaked containers worth of chemical) before sliding it on to a shelf somewhere. It saves a lot of cleaning up if some abused and reused container ever does pinhole or split.

    About the only time I ever heard of a shaking action being recommended by a materials supplier, it was to re-oxidise(?) a partially used bleach in a colour process. Stirring is the normal advice isn't it?
    Last edited by MartinP; 07-05-2013 at 11:38 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  7. #27
    fotch's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    SE WI- USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,098
    I tried reusing milk jugs for water refills at the grocery store and even after repeated rinsing, still have an off taste from the original use. I would think that this would also affect reuse for darkroom use.
    Items for sale or trade at www.Camera35.com

  8. #28
    Truzi's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Ohio, USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,024
    Quote Originally Posted by fotch View Post
    I tried reusing milk jugs for water refills at the grocery store and even after repeated rinsing, still have an off taste from the original use. I would think that this would also affect reuse for darkroom use.
    Then don't taste your chemicals


    For me, a jug typically has a handle of some sort, but is also usually seal-able with a cap, cork, bung, etc. The shape also has something to do with being a "jug" instead of "bottle."
    Tub is basically what you are thinking. "Basin" can be used (though basin usually denotes a more-or-less curved bottom). A tub is like a tray, but deeper. A bath tub, something you can soak your feet in, etc. Also used for garden plants (but not the same as a "flower pot"). We can use the word (as many of us use most words) very generically - and this often annoys me

    A tub is usually square or oblong (rectangular) but can be round, and generally has a flat bottom. While it may have gently sloping sides, generally a tub is completely open at the top along it's entirety - not curving in, no "opening" or "mouth." In my mind there is also a general size difference, as well as depth relative to surface area, between "basin" and "tub;" with tub being larger in both cases (and ignoring flat v. curved bottom).

    I put my plastic bottles of chemicals into buckets and basins in case of a leak.

    While I'm moving towards glass storage, I wonder if anyone has experience with large wine jugs/bottles (approximately 1 gallon/4 liters)? I believe the screw-caps on these will allow gas to escape under pressure, so am not sure if they are good for re-use when trying to block oxidation.

    Also on the point of mixing and wine/beer supplies, they sell "stirring wands" that you can attach to a power drill. These are rods with little "paddles" that are attached; the paddles pivot out of the way (fold against the want) so you can fit the rod in the mouth of your mixing vessel.
    You place the wand in the bottle/bucket/pail/jug/tub/jar/pot and turn on the drill - slowly.
    Truzi

  9. #29
    clayne's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    San Francisco, CA | Kuching, MY | Jakarta, ID
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,838
    Images
    57
    I just store the final mixed solution in 5L normal or 1-2L accordion bottles from freestyle. I know people have bitched about these before but I have NEVER had a problem with the accordion bottles from freestyle and they've done their job well.
    Stop worrying about grain, resolution, sharpness, and everything else that doesn't have a damn thing to do with substance.

    http://www.flickr.com/kediwah

  10. #30

    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Dayton, Ohio, USA
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    324
    Quote Originally Posted by Iluvmycam View Post
    What type of vessel do you use to mix the chemistry in?

    Do you find just putting dry chems in a jug and shake mixing works OK?
    I've done that. Some works well, some not so much. As I recall, a gallon of D-76 (old memory, could be something else) took ages to fully mix that way.

    About three years ago, I got a 4 liter beaker (cynmar.com, in this case), and I use that now (since I mix most powders by the gallon, regardless of hom I store them). If you are diluting liquids, anything goes.

Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin