Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,206   Posts: 1,531,786   Online: 912
      
Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 27
  1. #1

    Join Date
    May 2010
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    4

    Slide film for street photography

    I'll be taking my F4 and a handful of lenses to New Orleans in a month. I've got plenty of negative film ready to go, but I'd like to take a couple rolls of slide film (as I've got a new Kodak Carousel projector and screen).

    Any suggestions for decent slide film for street photoggin?

  2. #2
    clayne's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    San Francisco, CA | Kuching, MY | Jakarta, ID
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,838
    Images
    57
    Astia, Provia, or EPP. Honestly, any of 'em will work. Provia will afford you EI400. Make sure you use AE, a meter, or know light like the back of your hand. Great shots will only be made better by slide.
    Stop worrying about grain, resolution, sharpness, and everything else that doesn't have a damn thing to do with substance.

    http://www.flickr.com/kediwah

  3. #3
    Slixtiesix's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    717
    Images
    21
    Astia or Sensia (Astia was discontinued, I don´t know about Sensia), since these have great latitude. Or Provia 400X. If you need a fast film, this one is the way to go. Sharp, best grain for a 400 ISO slide film, nice colours (natural, but a bit on the saturated side).

  4. #4
    lxdude's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Redlands, So. Calif.
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    6,618
    Quote Originally Posted by clayne View Post
    Astia, Provia, or EPP. Honestly, any of 'em will work. Provia will afford you EI400.
    To clarify, there is ISO 100 Provia and ISO 400 Provia (400X).
    Make sure you use AE, a meter, or know light like the back of your hand. [/QUOTE]

    Meter incident, if you can. I don't recommend AE unless you tightly control it.
    Without an incident meter I find it's better to know light like the palm of your hand. That is, the method I use to ensure good exposure with slide film is to meter off the palm of my hand and open up a stop. Or read directly off a gray card. Both are effectively similar to incident reading the light, which I consider for slides superior to reading reflected light.
    I do use a digital device in my photographic pursuits when necessary.
    When someone rags on me for using film, I use a middle digit, upraised.

  5. #5

    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    193
    meter off the palm of my hand and open up a stop
    You better double check. If it were negative film, that would be on the safe side. With slide, that might be ~1/2 stop overexposed, which is worse than 1/2 under.

  6. #6
    MartinCrabtree's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Back in the hills
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    641
    Images
    2
    Why is slide film more difficult than color negative?

    The only slide film I've had problems with was Kodak color IR slide film (R.I.P.). If expose at box speed w/the camera's meter it was like 1-1 1/2 stops over exposed.

  7. #7

    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Tucson, Arizona
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    32
    Quote Originally Posted by MartinCrabtree View Post
    Why is slide film more difficult than color negative?

    The only slide film I've had problems with was Kodak color IR slide film (R.I.P.). If expose at box speed w/the camera's meter it was like 1-1 1/2 stops over exposed.
    Color slide film has much less latitude than negative film. If the exposure isn't "nailed" within about 1/2 stop it can easily result in photos that are either over-exposed (high lights blown out - just clear acetate film), or way too dark. I've shot a lot of color slides over a period starting in 1965, the most consistently acceptable results I obtained were after Nikon introduced their "Matrix" metering.

    Jim

  8. #8
    lxdude's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Redlands, So. Calif.
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    6,618
    Quote Originally Posted by bernard_L View Post
    You better double check. If it were negative film, that would be on the safe side. With slide, that might be ~1/2 stop overexposed, which is worse than 1/2 under.
    Nope. My palm has twice the reflectance of a gray card. Opening up a stop above a reading off my palm gives me readings which produce very well-exposed slides. I am careful to get the maximum reading off my palm though, and that is why.
    I do use a digital device in my photographic pursuits when necessary.
    When someone rags on me for using film, I use a middle digit, upraised.

  9. #9
    lxdude's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Redlands, So. Calif.
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    6,618
    Quote Originally Posted by JimCee View Post
    Color slide film has much less latitude than negative film. If the exposure isn't "nailed" within about 1/2 stop it can easily result in photos that are either over-exposed (high lights blown out - just clear acetate film), or way too dark. I've shot a lot of color slides over a period starting in 1965, the most consistently acceptable results I obtained were after Nikon introduced their "Matrix" metering.

    Jim
    Exposure can be corrected within limits when printing. Slides are the finished product, and their appearance is determined at the moment of exposure. As Jim says, there is not the latitude of negative film. That puts the burden on the photographer to get it right in the camera. The plus side of that burden is the ability to have complete control over the image, and the ability to exactly produce that part of the look desired which is influenced by exposure.
    I do use a digital device in my photographic pursuits when necessary.
    When someone rags on me for using film, I use a middle digit, upraised.

  10. #10

    Join Date
    May 2010
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    4
    I doubt I'll have a meter handy - other than the one in the camera. I'll be walking the streets of New Orleans (French Quarter, Marginay, Garden District, etc.), with my F4 and FE-2 and will be taking candid shots. I want to try my hand at slide shooting, although I know it will be more difficult than shooting the color negative film I'm also taking. I've shot slide film before, but that was over 20 years ago. Much of the slide film that I used then has been discontinued, so I'm a bit lost. I'm just looking for some tips from some of you who shoot slides in the field. Any an all advice will be welcomed and appreciated - including that above.

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin