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  1. #21
    markbarendt's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by selmslie View Post
    It depends on your water supply, not all dissolved minerals are detrimental. Kodak designed their chemicals and development times for "normal" tap water whatever that is. They do not specifically recommend distilled water because it might actually change the developer's performance slightly. I would be more concerned with the water used with the Photo-Flo, which at least ought to be filtered - distilled might be even better.
    selmslie you are right that chemicals designed by the likes of Kodak and Ilford are designed to be used with tap water.

    The biggest advantage of me using distilled to mix the chemicals is that eliminates a variable.
    Mark Barendt, Ignacio, CO

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  2. #22

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    Quote Originally Posted by MattKing View Post
    ...IIRC, the package directions themselves on D-76 recommend waiting 24 hours after mixing.
    I'm looking at a package of D-76. It has no such recommendation. The directions say (using graphics as well as words):

    "To Make 800ml (tap) water at 50-55C / 122 - 131F → Stir (contents of packet) Until Dissolved → add (tap) water to make 1 Liter"

  3. #23
    MattKing's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sal Santamaura View Post
    I'm looking at a package of D-76. It has no such recommendation. The directions say (using graphics as well as words):
    "To Make 800ml (tap) water at 50-55C / 122 - 131F → Stir (contents of packet) Until Dissolved → add (tap) water to make 1 Liter"
    Thanks Sal - I was hoping someone here would actually have a package to look at.

    I've obviously confused my sources.

    FWIW, there is no reference to this issue (or mixing in general) in any of the various Darkroom Dataguides I have here. And as Michael noted, there is no reference to mixing in the dataguide for D-76.

    EDIT: I'm sure though that somewhere there are or were instructions that specifically referred to allowing the developer to cool to room temperature.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

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  4. #24
    fotch's Avatar
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    [QUOTE=selmslie;1519441................ They do not specifically recommend distilled water because it might actually change the developer's performance slightly........................... [/QUOTE]

    Where did you get that info? I never read anything that said that from Kodak, did I miss it?
    Items for sale or trade at www.Camera35.com

  5. #25

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    Quote Originally Posted by Michael R 1974 View Post
    Since you used the word "legitimate", I'd say Kodak and Ilford are probably the most legitimate sources for D-76/ID-11. Follow their mixing/processing directions. I don't think either company indicates any kind of "stabilization" period is needed after mixing.
    This is a frequently repeating question.

    As I recall explanations from PE and others with knowledge beyond mine, D-76 mixed from standard formulas is more active for several hours after initially mixing. D-76 from a Kodak package has added buffering agents to compensate for that.

    Since I do the perpetual gallon jug with replinishment, waiting 24 hours after the rare new batch is no big deal. I just mix stuff in that before-mode, when I'm clearing clutter and dust so I am ready to deal with film. (Maybe I need to improve my housekeeping in general.)

  6. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by MattKing View Post
    EDIT: I'm sure though that somewhere there are or were instructions that specifically referred to allowing the developer to cool to room temperature.
    That's where the time/temperature thing comes in: x minutes at 68F or whatever. I use D-76 at 1:1; maybe I could mix it with ice water immediately after mixing it, but I never messed with that. I will sometimes put the bottle into a small tub of the coldest water that will come out of the tap. This hastens the cooling a little bit. I usually wait a minimum of four hours.

    I have D-76 packets downstairs; tonight I will scour the packet and check for waiting a bit.

    -- Mark

  7. #27
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    When making up D76 you have to wait for it before adding the cold water. It is a bit analogous to waiting for a draught Guinness to settle before drinking it.

    “The contemplation of things as they are, without error or confusion, without substitution or imposture, is in itself a nobler thing than a whole harvest of invention”

    Francis Bacon

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